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I'm looking to quickly cast about ~10-20M ISO date-time strings with microsecond precision to datetime64 for use as a DataFrame index in pandas.

I'm on pandas 0.9, and have tried the solutions suggested over on git, but I'm finding it taking 20 to 30 minutes, or never finishing.

I think I've found the problem. Compare the speed of these two:

rng = date_range('1/1/2000', periods=2000000, freq='ms')
strings = [x.strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f') for x in rng]
timeit to_datetime(strings)

On my laptop, ~300ms.

rng = date_range('1/1/2000', periods=2000000, freq='ms')
strings = [x.strftime('%Y%m%dT%H%M%S.%f') for x in rng]
timeit to_datetime(strings)

On my laptop, forever and a day.

I'm probably going to just change the c++ code that generates the timestamps to put them in the more verbose ISO form for now, as looping through and fixing the format on tens of millions of stamps is probably pretty slow...

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1 Answer 1

The fast parser code only handles standard ISO-8601 with dashes and colons-- and as you can see it's super fast when the strings are the right format. If you can be persuaded the code is on GitHub and could definitely be improved to handle more cases (preferably without slowing down the standard format too much).

As a partially satisfying workaround you could use datetime.strptime to convert the strings to datetime.datetime, then pass that result to to_datetime:

In [4]: paste
rng = date_range('1/1/2000', periods=2000000, freq='ms')
strings = [x.strftime('%Y%m%dT%H%M%S.%f') for x in rng]

## -- End pasted text --

In [5]: iso_strings = [x.strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S.%f') for x in rng]

In [6]: %timeit result = to_datetime(iso_strings)
1 loops, best of 3: 479 ms per loop

In [7]: f = lambda x: datetime.strptime(x, '%Y%m%dT%H%M%S.%f')

In [8]: f(strings[0])
Out[8]: datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1, 0, 0)

In [9]: %time result = to_datetime(map(f, strings))
CPU times: user 48.47 s, sys: 0.01 s, total: 48.48 s
Wall time: 48.54 s

It's 100x different but much better than 1000+% slower. I bet to_datetime could be improved to use the C version of strptime that would be much faster. Exercise left to the reader, I guess

A todo for someday: http://github.com/pydata/pandas/issues/2213

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Just saw this, thanks! This was pretty much what I ended up doing for one project -- for the other I was able to change the format to the preferred; I'll take a look at to_datetime. –  radikalus Jan 28 '13 at 18:01
1  
Actually the format used in the example is not the right format, combined data and time should be separated by a 'T' letter. The execution is fast even in that case using panda's to_datetime() –  anddam Jan 22 '14 at 16:25

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