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I starting out in assembla and have a code from my senior that I would like to pull the repository into my local folder.

When I typed:

svn co https://subversion.assembla.com/.... ./

Didn't state the whole path cos it is private.

When i type this in the terminal,

I get this error:

Error validating server certificate for 'https://subversion.assembla.com:443':
 - The certificate is not issued by a trusted authority. Use the
   fingerprint to validate the certificate manually!
Certificate information:
 - Hostname: *.assembla.com
 - Valid: from Thu, 24 Mar 2011 19:30:40 GMT until Sun, 24 Mar 2013 19:30:40 GMT
 - Issuer: 07969287, http://certificates.godaddy.com/repository, GoDaddy.com, Inc., Scottsdale, Arizona, US
 - Fingerprint: ae:b0:b6:94:14:5f:4b:28:d2:82:68:ae:e9:18:85:b3:ea:36:ee:f2
(R)eject, accept (t)emporarily or accept (p)ermanently?

What is my error? Have missed out something? Need some guidance on this...

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It's answered in Assembla FAQ: helpdesk.assembla.com/customer/portal/articles/708104-faq (scroll to the bottom). –  bahrep Oct 30 '12 at 6:58
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

ae:b0:b6:94:14:5f:4b:28:d2:82:68:ae:e9:18:85:b3:ea:36:ee:f2

This RSA fingerprint is correct for *.assembla.com. Just press 'p' and enter to permanently add it to your trusted certificates.

According to the Assembla support team, some SVN clients will not accept their certificates.

For future reference, never automatically accept suspicious certificates. Check with the issuing authority or the domain owner that holds the certificate.

See this forum thread for more info. http://forum.assembla.com/forums/2/topics/3063-Do-you-have-a-new-subversion-certificate

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