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I'm trying to design a Ruby script that will help with RC/RL circuit design by taking values of E24 series resistors and E12 and E6 series capacitors and inductors. Basically just cycling through each possible combination with the equation F = 1 / ( 2 * Pi * R * C ) [for the RC circuit for eg].

I'm not after efficiency here, just reliability. I need it to cycle through every single combination of the resistor array and capacitor/inductor array (never all 3) using the values for the equation above and if it is within plus/minus x% of a certain value to return which values in the array it used. I can nest 2 for loops to go through each combination, but I want it to not just return values within a tolerance but tell me which value is the closest (or exact).

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I like your question, but regretfully must ask the obligatory question on SO: What have you tried? Nevertheless, upvote. –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 30 '12 at 6:52
    
Just working on the code at the moment, will edit with what I have in a little bit... –  James McGrath Oct 30 '12 at 7:00
    
Sorry, I already answere, but only now I noticed you said never all 3 in your question? I hope my answer was helpful anyway... –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 30 '12 at 8:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is a mild refactoring of your code:

# I noticed that your resistance array is just the same set of values
# repeated with factors from 1 to 1000000, so this would be more concise
# way of defining it (and less prone to typing errors):
RES_ARRAY = [*-1..5].map{ |e| 10 ** e }.map{ |factor|
             [ 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 18, 20,
               22, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36, 39, 43,
               47, 51, 56, 62, 68, 75, 82, 91 ].map{ |e| e * factor }
           }.reduce( :+ )

# Global variables should be used very rarely. Constants should be written IN UPCASE:
CAP_ARRAY, IND_ARRAY = [], []
BREAK_FREQ = 19 * ( 10 ** 3 )

# Whole words should be used whenever possible in the code:
TOLERANCE = 0.997

# Methods should be named in snake_case:
def make_array( j, arr )
  # Let us use #each_slice and #map insterad of % and << operators:
  arr.each_slice( j ).map( &:first ).map{ |e| e * 1e-9 }
end

def cap_test
  puts "RC Circuit Estimation"
  for i in 0...RES_ARRAY.size
    for j in 0...CAP_ARRAY.size
      n = 1 / ( 2 * Math::PI * RES_ARRAY[ i ] * CAP_ARRAY[ j ] )
      if n > BREAK_FREQ * TOLERANCE and n < BREAK_FREQ * ( 2 - TOLERANCE )
        diff = 100 - ( ( n - BREAK_FREQ ) / BREAK_FREQ ).abs
        puts "Resistor:  #{RES_ARRAY[ i ]} Ohms"
        puts "Capacitor: #{CAP_ARRAY[ j ].to_f} F"
        puts "Within #{diff}%"
        puts "---------------------"
      end
    end
  end
end

def ind_test
  puts "RL Circuit Estimation"
  for i in 0...RES_ARRAY.size
    for j in 0...IND_ARRAY.size
      n = RES_ARRAY[ i ] / ( 2 * Math::PI * IND_ARRAY[ j ] )
      if n > BREAK_FREQ * TOLERANCE and n < BREAK_FREQ * ( 2 - TOLERANCE )
        diff = ( 1 - ( ( n - BREAK_FREQ ) / BREAK_FREQ ).abs ) * 100
        puts "Resistor:  #{RES_ARRAY[ i ]} Ohms"
        puts "Inductor: #{IND_ARRAY[ j ].to_f} H"
        puts "Within #{diff}%"
        puts "---------------------"
      end
    end
  end
end

make_array 2, CAP_ARRAY
make_array 4, IND_ARRAY
cap_Test()
ind_Test()
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After you define your E24, E12 and E6 arrays, CERTAIN_VALUE and desired DELTA, this should work:

F = lambda{ |i, r, c| 1 / ( 2 * i * r * c ) }

equation_solver = lambda {
  |equation, resistances, capacitances, inductances, desired_value, delta|
  resistances.find.with_object [] do |resistance, memo|
    capacitances.find.with_object memo do |capacitance, memo|
      inductances = E6.find{ |inductance|
        ( equation.(inductance, resistance, capacitance) - desired_value ).abs < delta
      } and memo << resistance << capacitance << inductance
    end
  end
}

desired_r_c_i = equation_solver.( F, E24, E12, E6, CERTAIN_VALUE, DELTA )
share|improve this answer
    
That is...remarkably concise, I haven't been using ruby long enough, what is the function of lambda and the braces? (and on that note...all the other braces) –  James McGrath Oct 30 '12 at 7:16
    
#lambda defines your function. Braces initialize a new array. The array is passed as a memo into the Enumerator object created by #find method by calling #with_object method on it. Once in the innermost loop, the satisfactory combination is found, memo object is filled with found r/l/c combination. #with_object method causes the memo object to be returned instead of merely found value. I'm not sure that there is no bug in my code, though. You need to try it. You are the one who is supposed to make effort :) –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 30 '12 at 7:25
    
And as for the conciseness, Ruby idea is to be preferrably as or more concise as when you describe what you want in natural speech :) That's what computers are for :) And if you want to delve more into why lamda is named lambda, you can start here. –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 30 '12 at 7:27
    
Thanks for all the help! I've only been working with quite basic stuff with ruby so far so in the mean time I worked out something that I just tested and it works well for me :D. I'll read up on how your code functions so I can wrap my head around it, I'll post my code below. –  James McGrath Oct 30 '12 at 8:17
$resArray = [1.0, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.5, 1.6, 1.8, 2.0, 2.2, 2.4, 2.7, 3.0, 3.3, 3.6, 3.9, 4.3, 4.7, 5.1, 5.6, 6.2, 6.8, 7.5, 8.2, 9.1,10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36, 39, 43, 47, 51, 56, 62, 68, 75, 82, 91,100, 110, 120, 130, 150, 160, 180, 200, 220, 240, 270, 300, 330, 360, 390, 430, 470, 510, 560, 620, 680, 750, 820, 910,1000, 1100, 1200, 1300, 1500, 1600, 1800, 2000, 2200, 2400, 2700, 3000, 3300, 3600, 3900, 4300, 4700, 5100, 5600, 6200, 6800, 7500, 8200, 9100, 10000, 11000, 12000, 13000, 15000, 16000, 18000, 20000, 22000, 24000, 27000, 30000, 33000, 36000, 39000, 43000, 47000, 51000, 56000, 62000, 68000, 75000, 82000, 91000, 100000, 110000, 120000, 130000, 150000, 160000, 180000, 200000, 220000, 240000, 270000, 300000, 330000, 360000, 390000, 430000, 470000, 510000, 560000, 620000, 680000, 750000, 820000, 910000, 1000000, 1100000, 1200000, 1300000, 1500000, 1600000, 1800000, 2000000, 2200000, 2400000, 2700000, 3000000, 3300000, 3600000, 3900000, 4300000, 4700000, 5100000, 5600000, 6200000, 6800000, 7500000, 8200000, 9100000, 1000000]
$capArray = Array.new
$indArray = Array.new
$breakFreq = 19*(10**3)
$tol = 0.997
$PI = Math.atan2(0,-1)

def makeArray(j,arr)
    for i in 0...$resArray.size
        if i%j == 0
        arr << $resArray[i]*(10**-9)
        end
    end
end

def capTest()
puts "RC Circuit Estimation"
    for i in 0...$resArray.size
        for j in 0...$capArray.size
            n = 1/(2*$PI*$resArray[i]*$capArray[j])
            if n > $breakFreq*$tol && n < $breakFreq*(2-$tol)
                diff = 100 - ((n-$breakFreq)/$breakFreq).abs
                puts "Resistor:  #{$resArray[i]} Ohms"
                puts "Capacitor: #{$capArray[j].to_f} F"
                puts "Within #{diff}%"
                puts "---------------------"
            end
        end
    end
end

def indTest()
puts "RL Circuit Estimation"
    for i in 0...$resArray.size
        for j in 0...$indArray.size
            n = $resArray[i]/(2*$PI*$indArray[j])
            if n > $breakFreq*$tol && n < $breakFreq*(2-$tol)
                diff = (1 - ((n-$breakFreq)/$breakFreq).abs)*100
                puts "Resistor:  #{$resArray[i]} Ohms"
                puts "Inductor: #{$indArray[j].to_f} H"
                puts "Within #{diff}%"
                puts "---------------------"
            end
        end
    end
end

makeArray(2,$capArray)
makeArray(4,$indArray)
capTest()
indTest()
share|improve this answer
    
It's not nearly as nice looking...but it works wonders –  James McGrath Oct 30 '12 at 8:21
    
There is one thing I would like to beg of you. Please don't use the global variables, such as $resArray. That's no ordinary code smell, that's code stench :) Use simply constants, such as ResArray etc. instead. –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 30 '12 at 8:24
    
And when it comes to π value, use simply Math::PI. –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 30 '12 at 8:26
    
Furthermore, that makeArray method is something terrible. Use #map method instead. –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 30 '12 at 8:34
    
Thank you for the tips! I have a lot to learn :P –  James McGrath Oct 30 '12 at 11:14

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