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A number is called digit-increasing if it is equal n + nn + nnn + ... for some digit n between 1 and 9. For example 24 is digit-increasing because it equals 2 + 22 (here n = 2).

Actually, a friend of mine asked me this question and i am stuck thinking about it but couldn't find the exact solution so far. Can anyone help ? I needed the function that returns true if it is digit-increasing else false.

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I will answer if you don't require an answer in a particular language. –  Jan Dvorak Oct 30 '12 at 7:18
    
I just want the logic. Code in any language will do. –  nebula Oct 30 '12 at 7:19
5  
You just have 9 options to try from. It is either (1+11+...) or (2+22+...)... or (9+99+...). –  Vikas Oct 30 '12 at 7:19
    
Then tag [algorithm] –  Jan Dvorak Oct 30 '12 at 7:19
    
you can use modulo/division method for number separation.Like, 24/10=2 then multiply it by 10 so u get 20. then add quotient '2' to this '20' u get '22'. Now try to add '22' to quotient again then u get 24. if it equal to given number then it is digit-increasing. Just generalize it for N digits. Its simple. –  SRJ Oct 30 '12 at 7:41

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have done in this way. Check out once.

int sum = 0, count =0;
bool flag = false;

public bool isDigitIncreasing(int input_number)
{
int  n= get_number_of_digit(input_number); // Gets number of digits
int sum = 0;
    for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
    {
        sum = sum*10+1;
        count = count + sum;
    }

    for(int i=1; i<=9;i++)
    {
        if((input_number)==count*i)
        {
            flag = true;
            break;
        }
        else
        flag = false;
    }
    return flag;

}

    public int get_number_of_digit(int num)
    {

        int size = 0;
        do
        {
            num = num/10;
            size++;
        }while(num>0);
        return size;
    }
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There are only relatively few numbers with this property: Within the range of unsigned long long (64 bits), there are only 172 digit-increasing numbers.

Therefore, in terms of a practical solution, it makes sense to pre-compute them all and put them in a hash. Here is Python code for that:

# Auxiliary function that generates
# one of the 'nnnn' elements
def digits(digit,times):
  result = 0
  for i in range(times):
    result += digit*(10**i)
  return result

# Pre-computing a hash of digit-increasing
# numbers:
IncDig = {}
for i in range(1,30):
  for j in range(1,10):
    number = reduce(lambda x,y:x+y,[digits(j,k) for k in range(1,i+1)])
    IncDig[number] = None

Then the actual checking function is just a look-up in the hash:

def IncDigCheck(number):
  return (number in IncDig)

This is virtually O(1), and the time and space taken for the pre-calculation is minimal, because there are only 9 distinct digits (zero doesn't count), hence only K*9 combinations of type n + nn + ... for a sum of length K.

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Every O(n) algorithm is O(1) when n is restricted to some constant. –  Saeed Amiri Oct 30 '12 at 13:44
    
@SaeedAmiri That's not the point. The point is that the look-up in the hash does not depend on the size of the number you look up, and not even on the number of entries. (The latter is not completely true, depending on how the hash deals with collisions. That is why I said virtually O(1).) –  jogojapan Oct 30 '12 at 14:09
    
In Python, for integers, hash(x) == x, so it is easily possible that some of collisions are really bad. –  Dietrich Epp Oct 30 '12 at 20:24
    
@jogojapan, what's the benefit of this? at first you do a search as large as biggest numbers, then you saying it's O(1)? I'm pretty sure your algorithm is slower than any other exhaustive search presented in answers here, all of them are doing search till necessary, but you run it for all data. –  Saeed Amiri Oct 31 '12 at 7:46
    
@SaeedAmiri The first step isn't search. It's pre-calculation. You pre-calculate the 172 numbers that exist (assuming 64 bit integers). (By the way, the implementation I use for the pre-calculation is naive. Every digit-increasing number could be computed in one step from a previously computed one, for example 1+11+111 can be computed by adding 111 to the previously computed 1+11. But it doesn't matter much because you do the pre-computation only once). The effect of the pre-calculation is that later you can do millions of number checks, and each check is just a hash lookup. –  jogojapan Oct 31 '12 at 8:09

Here is a python code.The basic logic here is that a digit increasing number if divided by a specific number between 1-9 gives a digit increasing number made of only ones.All the digit increasing numbers of 1 follow a specific pattern ie 12345678...

import sys
for n in range(1,10):
    a=1
    if k%n!=0:
        a=0
    else:
        g=str(k/n)
        j=int(g[0])
        for i in range(1,len(g)):
            if int(g[i])==j+1:
                j=int(g[i])
            else:
                a=0
                break
    if a==1:
        print "Yes,it is a digit increasing number"
        sys.exit(0)
print "No,it is not a digit increasing number"
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1  
Very good point! –  jogojapan Nov 1 '12 at 3:41
    
I think this is more optimized than creating numerous digit increasing numbers and comparing the number we got against them –  Tyranicangel Nov 1 '12 at 5:44
    
Maybe. There are still several computational steps for each number involved in your method, and the hash of my answer (that's what you refer to, right?) may well be in L1 cache, thus providing great speed. But, yes, your method is definitely very good. That's why I upvoted it. –  jogojapan Nov 1 '12 at 5:50

Simple exhaustive search will work.

def is_digit_increasing_number(x):
    # n = 1, 1+11, 1+11+111, ...
    n = 1
    i = 1
    while n <= x:
        if x % n == 0 and n * 10 > x:
            return True
        i += 1
        n = n * 10 + i
    return False
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Simplest possible way is do the addition (bottom-up), I'll use simple for loop:

List<int> numbersSum = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
List<int> lastNumber = new List<int>{1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
for(int i=0;i<= lg n + 1;i++)
{

   for(int j=0;j<9;j++)
   {
      if(list[j] < n)
      {
          var lastNumberJ = lastNumber[j]*10+j+1;
          list[j] += lastNumberJ; // add numbers to see will be same as n.
          if (list[j] == n)
            return j+1;
          lastNumber[j] = lastNumberJ;
      }
   }   
}

return -1;

The important part is you just need at most log n iteration and also you can return sooner if all numbers are bigger than given number, this is O(log n) algorithm.

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+1 for pointing out the log-n bound. (That's a base-10 logarithm, right?) –  jogojapan Oct 31 '12 at 8:28
    
@jogojapan, actually it's not important to be in base 2 or 10, but I wrote it for base 10. –  Saeed Amiri Oct 31 '12 at 9:29
    
Ok, then maybe I don't understand it fully. I thought the point is that if a given number M is equivalent to a sum n + nn + nnn + ..., then the number of n's in the last element of the sum cannot be greater than log M. Clearly that is true for base 10, because otherwise the final element would have more decimal places than M itself. How would this work with a logarithm on a different base? In particular a base greater than 10? –  jogojapan Oct 31 '12 at 9:42
1  
@jogojapan, You are right in the exact case and because of this I wrote my assumption was base 10, this is motivation to logarithmic order, but I wrote it in O notation, not exact notation, so in O notation there is no difference between log in base 10 or base 2 or ... –  Saeed Amiri Oct 31 '12 at 9:46
    
Oh right, sure. I meant the lg n in the code, not the log n in the big-oh notation. Thanks. –  jogojapan Oct 31 '12 at 9:47

Ambiguitiy: Are the values 1-9 repeating for themselves? (too lazy to google this myself)

If 1-9 are repeating then following should work. If not, and you want the code to work only on values > 10 then you can initialize mult with 10.

int i, mult = 1, result, flag;

for( i=1; i<9; i++ )
{
    flag = 0;

    while( result < TARGET )
    {
        result = result+(i*mult);
        mult   = mult*10;

        if( result == TARGET )
        {
            flag = 1;
            break;
        }
    }
    if( flag == 1 )
        break;
}

After execution, i must contain the values for which RESULT is a repeating number IF the flag is 1. If flag is zero after execution then the TARGET isn't a repeating number.

I wonder if its possible that a number could be repeating for multiple values, just curious.

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Here num is the number and n is the digit

#include<stdio.h>

int f(int num,int n)
{
 int d=n;
 while(num>0)
 {
        num-=n;
        n=d+n*10;
 }
 if(num==0)
        return 1;
 else
        return 0;
}

int main()
{
 int num;
 int n;
 int flag;
 printf("Enter the number :");
 scanf("%d",&num);
 printf("Enter the digit :");
 scanf("%d",&n);
 flag = f(num,n);
 if(flag == 1)
        printf("It's in n+nn+nnn+...\n");
 if(flag ==0)
        printf("It's not\n");
 return 0;
}
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I think OP want algorithm without necessity of entering base digit –  Denis Ermolin Oct 30 '12 at 9:37
    
you can try it using one more loop for checking with each base digit –  Omkant Oct 30 '12 at 9:44
    
Why me? I dont need this algorithm) –  Denis Ermolin Oct 30 '12 at 9:45
    
@DenisErmolin : Sorry I meant OP actually , but it's my native typing style –  Omkant Oct 30 '12 at 9:46

General representation is: n + (n*10 + n) + (n*100+n)... .If number look like sum of same digits then any digit can represent as (1+111+...) * base_digit. Assume this we can make simple algorithm:

bool isDigitIncreasing(const int num)
{
    int n = 1;
    int sum = 1; //value to increase n
    while (n <= num) {
        //if num is (111...) * base_digit and base_digit is < 10
        if (num % n == 0 && n * 10 > num) return true;
        sum = sum * 10 + 1; //N*10+N where n is 1 as was assumed
        n += sum;  //next step
    }
    return false;
}
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 public boolean isDigitIncreasing(int number)

 {
  int sum;
  int size=calculateNumberOfDigits(number);

  for(int i=1;i<=9;i++)
   {
      sum=0;
      int temp=size;
      while(temp>=1)
        {
            for(int j=temp;j<=1;j--)
             {
                sum=sum+i*(int)Math.pow(10,j-1);
             }
            temp--;
         }
      if(sum==number)
       {
          return true;//Its a digit increasing
        }
    }

     return false;
  }

 public int calculateNumberOfDigits(int number)
  {
     int size=0;
     do
       {
             number=number/10;
             size++;
        }while(size>0);

       return size;
  }
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