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To detect when an outgoing call is answered, I tried creating a PhoneStateListener and listening for TelephonyManager's CALL_STATE_RINGING, CALL_STATE_OFFHOOK, and CALL_STATE_IDLE, from this question, but it does not seem to work, as explained below.

First, I registered the following permission in the manifest:

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.PROCESS_OUTGOING_CALLS" />

Then, a BroadcastReceiver called OutCallLogger that catches the NEW_OUTGOING_CALL event whenever an outgoing call is made:

<receiver android:name=".listener.OutCallLogger">
    <intent-filter>
        <action android:name="android.intent.action.NEW_OUTGOING_CALL" />
    </intent-filter>
</receiver>

Next, my implementation of OutCallLogger. I set up a boolean called noCallListenerYet to avoid attaching a new PhoneStateListener to the TelephonyManager whenever onReceive() is invoked.

public class OutCallLogger extends BroadcastReceiver {

    private static boolean noCallListenerYet = true;

    @Override
    public void onReceive(final Context context, Intent intent) {
        number = intent.getStringExtra(Intent.EXTRA_PHONE_NUMBER);
        if (noCallListenerYet) {
            final TelephonyManager tm = (TelephonyManager) context.getSystemService(
                    Context.TELEPHONY_SERVICE);
            tm.listen(new PhoneStateListener() {
                @Override
                public void onCallStateChanged(int state, String incomingNumber) {
                    switch (state) {
                        case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_RINGING:
                            Log.d(This.LOG_TAG, "RINGING");
                            break;
                        case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_OFFHOOK:
                            Log.d(This.LOG_TAG, "OFFHOOK");
                            break;
                        case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_IDLE:
                            Log.d(This.LOG_TAG, "IDLE");
                            break;
                        default:
                            Log.d(This.LOG_TAG, "Default: " + state);
                            break;
                    }
                }
            }, PhoneStateListener.LISTEN_CALL_STATE);
            noCallListenerYet = false;
        }
    }

}

Now, when I make an outgoing call in my device, CALL_STATE_RINGING is NEVER invoked. I always only get printouts of "IDLE" to "OFFHOOK" when the other line starts ringing, nothing when the call is answered, and a printout of "IDLE" again when the call is ended.

How can I reliably detect when an outgoing call is answered in Android, or is that even possible?

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6 Answers

The question maybe has no solution. I also want to find the answer before, but I only find two solution for the question. one is "PhoneStateListener" method, but it only judge "call in" status, another is "READ_LOGS" method, but it is not accurate.

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I think I remember reading somewhere that this is not possible. However, I made a call with my Samsung phone and when the other side picked up, the call timer started. –  Matt Quiros Nov 2 '12 at 6:24
    
By the way, what is the "READ_LOGS" method? –  Matt Quiros Nov 3 '12 at 15:12
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Please pay your attention at:

tm.listen(new PhoneStateListener() {
            @Override
            public void onCallStateChanged(int state, String incomingNumber) {
                switch (state) {
                    case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_RINGING:
                        Log.d(This.LOG_TAG, "RINGING");
                        break;
                    case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_OFFHOOK:
                        Log.d(This.LOG_TAG, "OFFHOOK");
                        break;
                    case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_IDLE:
                        Log.d(This.LOG_TAG, "IDLE");
                        break;
                    default:
                        Log.d(This.LOG_TAG, "Default: " + state);
                        break;
                }
            }
        }, PhoneStateListener.LISTEN_CALL_STATE);

Do you see "incomingNumber" argument? Yes, that code just can only detect your phone-call-state when there is an incoming-phone-call to your device.

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Maybe try to use CallManager? Check out http://grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/ext/com.google.android/android/2.3.3_r1/com/android/internal/telephony/CallManager.java. I also found CallManager.java among the SDK files on my computer. The following text from the linked page seems promising:

Register for getting notifications for change in the Call State Call.State This is 
called PreciseCallState because the call state is more precise than the Phone.State 
which can be obtained using the android.telephony.PhoneStateListener Resulting events 
will have an AsyncResult in Message.obj. AsyncResult.userData will be set to the obj 
argument here. The h parameter is held only by a weak reference.

1051
1052    public void registerForPreciseCallStateChanged(Handler h, int what, Object obj){
1053        mPreciseCallStateRegistrants.addUnique(h, what, obj);
1054    }

I haven't tried to code anything, so really don't know if it can do what you want, but I am curious to know.

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You could do the following... not very precise but could do the trick:

  1. You use the receiver for the android.intent.action.NEW_OUTGOING_CALL action
  2. When the receiver is called you store somewhere (for instance a static var) the NEW_OUTGOIN_CALL state and the time in ms when this happened (i.e. new Date().getTime())
  3. You use the another receiver for android.intent.action.PHONE_STATE and in the onReceive you do the following:

    if (intent.getAction().equals("android.intent.action.PHONE_STATE")) {
        TelephonyManager telephony = (TelephonyManager) context.getSystemService(Context.TELEPHONY_SERVICE);
        telephony.listen(new PhoneStateListener() {
            public void onCallStateChanged(int state, String incomingNumber) {
                  switch(state) {
                    case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_IDLE:
                    break;
                    case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_OFFHOOK:
                    break;
                    case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_RINGING:
                    break;
                   }
            } 
        }, PhoneStateListener.LISTEN_CALL_STATE);
    
    }
    

In the CALL_STATE_OFFHOOK case you check that the last stored state was NEW_OUTGOING_CALL and that the no more than aprox. 10 seconds have passed since the last state change. This means that the phone initiated a call at most 10 seconds ago and that now he is in the offhook state (meaning active call) without passing through idle or ringing. This could mean that the call was answered.

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I just tried this approach and I'm afraid it doesn't work. Here's my code: pastie.org/5846783. I created a broadcast receiver that accepts the two intents as you mentioned. I even included the call states that start with EXTRA_STATE just to make sure. However, making an outgoing call just never goes through either EXTRA_STATE_RINGING or CALL_STATE_RINGING--it immediately proceeds to EXTRA- and CALL_STATE_OFFHOOK, nothing is invoked when the outgoing call is answered, and EXTRA- and CALL_STATE_IDLE are called when it ends. Tested with a Nexus 4 on Android 4.2.1. –  Matt Quiros Jan 24 '13 at 13:37
1  
This does not work. You get CALL_STATE_OFFHOOK when you hit the "Send" button, but you get nothing when the other side answers the call. –  OferR Jan 30 '13 at 7:34
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It looks like the RINGING state is reached only by incoming calls. Outgoing calls change from IDLE to OFFHOOK, so looking at the Phone State maybe is not possible to achieve this.

I think that it could be possible using internal functions, look at this: What does the different Call states in the Android telephony stack represent?

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Here your answer is that you have implemented CallStateListener in OutGoingCallReceiver which is wrong. You have to implement CallStateListener in PhoneStateListener

I have also tried this thing in my earlier project, I had faced the same issue, then I solved it like as below. I took 3 classes as below.

  1. AutoCallReceiver: Register the TelephonyManager with PhoneStateListener.LISTEN_CALL_STATE

  2. CallStateListener which listens three states as TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_IDLE,TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_OFFHOOK,TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_RINGING

3.OutGoingCallReceiver which handles out going call

public class OutGoingCallReceiver extends BroadcastReceiver {  

    /* onReceive will execute on out going call */
    @Override  
    public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {  

         Toast.makeText(context, "OutGoingCallReceiver", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();

    }  
  } 

public class CallStateListener extends PhoneStateListener {  

    String number=""; // variable for storing incoming/outgoing number
    Context mContext; // Application Context


    //Constructor that will accept Application context as argument
    public CallStateListener(Context context) {
        mContext=context;
    }

    // This function will automatically invoke when call state changed
    public void onCallStateChanged(int state,String incomingNumber)
    {  
           boolean end_call_state=false; // this variable when true indicate that call is disconnected
           switch(state)
               {  
                 case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_IDLE:  
                       // Handling Call disconnect state after incoming/outgoing call 
                     Toast.makeText(mContext, "idle", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();


                  break;  

                 case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_OFFHOOK:     
                     // Handling outgoing call  
                     Toast.makeText(mContext, "OFFHOOK", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                      // saving outgoing call state so that after disconnect idle state can act accordingly


                  break;  
                 case TelephonyManager.CALL_STATE_RINGING: 
                     Toast.makeText(mContext, "RINGING", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();

                  break;  

               }  


    }   

  } 

public class AutoCallReceiver extends BroadcastReceiver {  


   /* onReceive will execute on call state change */
    @Override  
    public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) { 

        // Instantiating PhoneStateListener
        CallStateListener phoneListener=new CallStateListener(context);  

        // Instantiating TelephonyManager
      TelephonyManager telephony = (TelephonyManager)   
               context.getSystemService(Context.TELEPHONY_SERVICE);  

        // Registering the telephony to listen CALL STATE change
      telephony.listen(phoneListener,PhoneStateListener.LISTEN_CALL_STATE);  
    }  

}

 <receiver android:name=".OutGoingCallReceiver">
    <intent-filter>
      <action android:name="android.intent.action.NEW_OUTGOING_CALL" />
    </intent-filter>
</receiver>
 <receiver android:name=".AutoCallReceiver">
            <intent-filter>
                     <action android:name="android.intent.action.PHONE_STATE" />
            </intent-filter>
         </receiver>
    </application>
 <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.PROCESS_OUTGOING_CALLS"/>
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Isn't this exactly what I did, only less specific? –  Matt Quiros Oct 30 '12 at 7:36
    
Sorry, I have updated my answer, you have to implement CallStateListener in PhoneStateListener –  Maneesh Oct 30 '12 at 8:13
    
First of all, AutoCallReceiver does not catch outgoing calls. Secondly, the insides of AutoCallReceiver still do exactly what I wrote in the question. –  Matt Quiros Oct 30 '12 at 8:57
    
AutoCallReceiver is only for invoking phonestateListener which catch idle,offshook and ringing state, and you have implemented this in OutGoingCallReceiver which is wrong –  Maneesh Oct 30 '12 at 9:22
2  
I understand from your code that when an outgoing call is made, it fires NEW_OUTGOING_CALL so it goes to OutGoingCallReceiver which does nothing but show a Toast. Then, when an incoming call arrives (which isn't the stated problem), the PHONE_STATE intent is fired and the app crashes before AutoCallReceiver even executes because you didn't include the READ_PHONE_STATE permission. But anyway, you simply put the PhoneStateListener in an external class while I wrote it as an anonymous class. The intended effect is therefore the same. –  Matt Quiros Oct 30 '12 at 10:59
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