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I want to define a class inside a class.

example:

private class newClient
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name{ get; set; }        

    private class ClientExtraData
    {
       public string ExtraField1 { get; set; }
       public string ExtraField2 { get; set; }
    }
}

now i want to access the ExtraField1 in such way:

newClient nclnt= new newClient();
string s=nclnt.ClientExtraData.ExtraField1;

Can this be done?

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2  
What is your original task you're solving in this strange way? –  zerkms Oct 30 '12 at 9:01
    
Make it static or create an instance in the parent class. –  Maurice Stam Oct 30 '12 at 9:03
4  
How about declaring a public property returning ClientExtraData –  L.B Oct 30 '12 at 9:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

No you can't access the internal class in this way nclnt.ClientExtraData.ExtraField1; because you must have an instance of that object if you want to access its properties. Then you can't use the private access modifier but you have to use internal in this way:

class newClient
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public ClientExtraData clientExtraData{ get; set; }

    public newClient()
    {
        clientExtraData = new ClientExtraData();
    }

    internal class ClientExtraData
    {
        public string ExtraField1 { get; set; }
        public string ExtraField2 { get; set; }
    }
}

Or you can make ClientExtraData public instead of internal if you want to make it accessible outside newClient in this way:

newClient.ClientExtraData clientExtraData = new newClient.ClientExtraData();

So then you can do:

newClient nclnt= new newClient();
string s = nclnt.clientExtraData.ExtraField1;
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worked Fuex, thanks. –  Dror Oct 30 '12 at 9:29

To Achieve the below,

newClient nclnt= new newClient();
string s=nclnt.ClientExtraData.ExtraField1;

All you need to do is expose a property like this

private class NewClient
{
        public class NewClient() 
        {
            this.ClientExtraData = new ClientData();
        }
        public int ID { get; set; }
        public string Name{ get; set; }
        public ClientData ClientExtraData {get;set;}
}

where ClientData is a class in your assembly.

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Don't forget to instantiate it in the constructor(s). –  Maurice Stam Oct 30 '12 at 9:05
    
@Aphelion I would leave that to the developer implementing it as, few scenarios would require to Initialize it when creating the class. –  Ramesh Oct 30 '12 at 9:07
    
I don't agree. He wants to access the field, so it should be there ;) –  Maurice Stam Oct 30 '12 at 9:11
    
@Aphelion - Yeah it makes sense. Updating my answer –  Ramesh Oct 31 '12 at 4:23

No it can't be done like that. The class is not a method, property or anything which is instanziated by the class.

It is also very bad design :-)

You could however say:

var myclass = new ClassOne.ClassTwo()

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I usually do this kind of stuff like this:

//the two classes can live in the same code file, if you want.
private class ClientExtraDataClass
{
    public string ExtraField1 { get; set; }
   public string ExtraField2 { get; set; }
}
private class newClient
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Name{ get; set; }

    //you may want to make it a readonly property too, 
    // it depends on your needs.
    public ClientExtraDataClass ClientExtraData = new ClientExtraDataClass();
}
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to archieve exactly this with your code

newClient nclnt= new newClient();
string s=nclnt.ClientExtraData.ExtraField1;

the newClient class have to be public and the ClientExtraData class have to be public and static

but the better approach is definetly to create to classes, where newClient contains a Get-Property to an instance of the ClientExtraData class.

look at Access Modifiers (C# Programming Guide)

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  1. Make the inner class public so that it can be accessed.
  2. Make the property you need to access as static (or create instance to access the field)

class newClient { public int ID { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; }

    public class ClientExtraData
    {
        public static string ExtraField1 { get { return "10"; }  }
        public string ExtraField2 { get; set; }
    }
}

Access code:

newClient nclnt = new newClient(); string s = newClient.ClientExtraData.ExtraField1;

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