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I’ve been working on a C# maze generator for a while which can generate mazes of like 128000x128000 pixels. All memory usage is optimized already so I’m currently looking at speeding the generation up.

A problem (well more off an interest point) I found was the following (just some example code to illustrate the problem):

This code runs in about 1.4 seconds on my machine when pixelChanged is null:

public void Go()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < bitjes.Length; i++)
    {
        BitArray curArray = bitjes[i];
        for (int y = 0; y < curArray.Length; y++)
        {
            curArray[y] = !curArray[y];
            GoDrawPixel(i, y, false);
        }
    }
}

public void GoDrawPixel(int i, int y, Boolean enabled)
{
    if (pixelChanged != null)
    {
        pixelChanged.Invoke(new PixelChangedEventArgs(i, y, enabled));
    }
}

Where the following code runs actually 0.4 seconds faster

public void Go()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < bitjes.Length; i++)
    {
        BitArray curArray = bitjes[i];
        for (int y = 0; y < curArray.Length; y++)
        {
            curArray[y] = !curArray[y];
            if (pixelChanged != null)
            {
                pixelChanged.Invoke(new PixelChangedEventArgs(i, y, false));
            }
        }
    }
}

It seems that when just calling an “empty” method takes about 20% of the cpu this algorithm uses. Isn’t this strange? I’ve tried to compile the solution in debug and release mode but haven’t found any noticeable differences.

What this means is that every method call I have in this loop will slow my code down by about 0.4 seconds. Since the maze generator code currently consist of a lot of seperate method calls that excecute different actions this starts to get a substantial ammount.

I've also checked google and other posts on Stack Overflow but haven't really found a solution yet.

Is it possible to automatically optimize code like this? (Maybe with things like project Roslyn???) or should I place everything together in one big method?

Edit: I'm also interested in maybe some analysis on the JIT/CLR code differences in these 2 cases. (So where this problem actually comes from)

Edit2: All code was compiled in release mode

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is a problem, JIT has an inline optimization for methods (where the whole method code is actually injected inside the calling parent code) but this only happens for methods that are compiled to 32 bytes or less. I have no idea why the 32 byte limitation exists and would also like to see an 'inline' keyword in C# like in C/C++ exactly for these issues.

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I've never heard of the inline keyword but it seems to do exactly what I need :), I hope Microsoft can add it to C# someday too. –  Devedse Oct 30 '12 at 9:34
    
check this out: stackoverflow.com/questions/473782/inline-functions-in-c –  Gilad Oct 30 '12 at 9:42
    
greenend.org.uk/rjk/tech/inline.html –  Gilad Oct 30 '12 at 9:43
    
I've tried to put [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.AggressiveInlining)] in front of my GoDrawPixel(......) method with no avail. It is still 0.4 seconds slower then the direct implementation. –  Devedse Oct 30 '12 at 10:14
    
This will work only in framework 4.5 (Visual studio 2012) –  Gilad Oct 30 '12 at 10:18

Is this in debug or release mode? Method calls are fairly expensive, but they may be inlined when you build/run it in release mode. It will not get any optimization from the compiler in debug mode.

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I've tried it in both release and debug. Both were about 0.4 seconds slower in the case of calling a method. –  Devedse Oct 30 '12 at 9:32
    
@Devedse: How did you inline the methods? –  Luis Filipe Oct 30 '12 at 9:39
    
@Luis Filipe: I manually copied the code as you can see in the main topic. –  Devedse Oct 30 '12 at 9:49

The first thing I would try would be making it static rather than instance:

public static void GoDrawPixel(PixelChangedEventHandler pixelChanged,
    int x, int y, bool enabled)
{
    if (pixelChanged != null)
    {
        pixelChanged.Invoke(new PixelChangedEventArgs(x, y, enabled));
    }
}

this changes a few things:

  • the stack semantics remain comparable (it loads a reference, 2 ints and a bool either way)
  • the callvirt becomes call - which avoids some minor overheads
  • the ldarg0/ldfld pair (this.pixelChanged) becomes a single ldarg0

the next thing I would look at is PixelChangedEventArgs; it might be that passing that as a struct is cheaper if it avoids a lot of allocations; or perhaps just:

pixelChanged(x, y, enabled);

(raw arguments rather than a wrapper object - requires a change in signature)

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I've already looked into the pixelChanged(x, y, enabled) which indeed sped things up a bit. Can you maybe explain a bit what you mean by the callvirt and call differences? and the ldarg0/ldfld pair? –  Devedse Oct 30 '12 at 9:29
    
@Devedse in the instance method, you access this.pixelChanged twice where-as if we pass that in a parameter if it only done once; once the reference is on stack as a local or parameter (arg0 in this case), it is marginally quicker to get at; besides, making it a parameter is a necessity if we make it static rather than instance. –  Marc Gravell Oct 30 '12 at 9:33
    
I've tried your code and now it's about 0.25 seconds slower instead of 0.4. We're improving :) –  Devedse Oct 30 '12 at 10:31

The main overhead is, as Marc said, making that virtual call and passing the arguments. Can the value of PixelChanged change during the execution of method? If not this might work (I'm not completely sure JIT optimizes the empty action delegate into a nop, you'll have to test that on your own (if it doesn't I'll just disregard good practices here and just make to calls, one with pixelChanged.Invoke called and one without (inline) and just call whatever suits best... after all sometimes you have to make the code a little less elegant in order for it to be fast).

public void Go()
{
  if (pixelChanged != null)  
     GoPixelGo((x,y,z) => { });  
  else
     GoPixelGo((i, y, enabled) => pixelChanged.Invoke(i, y, enabled));
}

public void GoPixelGo(Action<int, int, bool> action)
{
  for (int i = 0; i < bitjes.Length; i++)
  {
      BitArray curArray = bitjes[i];
      for (int y = 0; y < curArray.Length; y++)
      {
         curArray[y] = !curArray[y];
         action(i,y, false);
      }
  }
}
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That took a while for me to understand, but I indeed see what you're doing now. I'll try this out too. –  Devedse Oct 30 '12 at 10:22
    
I guess it depends which case you need to optimize for. For the "pixelChanged is null" case, I would expect the null-test to be faster, due to the cost of delegate-invoke (fast, but not as fast as a null-test). For the "pixelChanged not null" case, then indeed removing the null-test might be helpful. It really depends which scenario is the most likely. –  Marc Gravell Oct 30 '12 at 10:39
    
I've tried this and it's also about 0.25 seconds slower then the direct way. –  Devedse Oct 30 '12 at 10:44

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