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In the video I've found that interfaces can use strange overload technique. The code below is compiled but does not work. I have some questions, all of them are placed inside of the code:

interface X{

// how can the class implements such overload ?
    f:{ 
        (s:string):string;
        (s:number):string;
        data:any;
    };
}

class xxx
{

// how to initialize this structure ?
    f:{   
        (s:string):string;
        (s:number):string;
        data:any;
    };
}


var x = new xxx();

// how should the class xxxx look to be used with this function ?
function a(x:X):string{
    return x.f("1");    
}

a(x);
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I think you're trying to call the function f with either a string or a number.

In your interface, you define the overloads like this:

interface X{
    b(s:string) : string;

    f (s:string):string;
    f (s:number):string;
}

And you implement the interface like this.

class xxx implements X
{
    b(s:string) : string
    {
        return "";      
    }

    f (s: string): string;
    f (s: number) : string;
    f (s: any) : string {
        return s.toString();
    }
}

Here is complete example you can paste into the Playground to try:

interface X {
    b(s:string) : string;
    f (s:string):string;
    f (s:number):string;
}

class xxx implements X {
    b(s:string) : string {
        return "";      
    }

    f (s: string): string;
    f (s: number) : string;
    f (s: any) : string {
        return s.toString();
    }
}

var x = new xxx();

alert(x.f("1"));
alert(x.f(5));
share|improve this answer
    
No, I'd like to know how to use the interface from my post, not yours. –  Mad Hollander Oct 30 '12 at 10:38
    
Updated based on your comment. –  Steve Fenton Oct 30 '12 at 10:45
    
You still have different declaration of the interface. –  Mad Hollander Oct 30 '12 at 10:52
1  
FTR: Reverted to original answer, which is the readable way to define overloads in TypeScript. Additionally, I would define data separately to the function overload in a class field. –  Steve Fenton Oct 30 '12 at 16:57
1  
Well, I covered that in my previous comment. This answer is for people who encounter the question and want to use overloads. Your answer is for your localised scenario. Everyone is a winner. –  Steve Fenton Oct 30 '12 at 20:40
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only solution I've found is to use type cast. It works, but looks quite ugly. To me this is an error in the compiler or there should be different way to do this.

UPD: Indeed, this is the only solution, http://typescript.codeplex.com/discussions/401235

interface X{
    f:{ 
        (s:string):string; 
        (s:number):string; 
        data:any; 
    };
}

class xxx
{
    constructor()
    {
        this.f = <{ (s:string):string; (s:number):string; data:any; }> function (s:any):string {return s.toString();};
        this.f.data = "data" 
    };

    f:{ 
        (s:string):string;
        (s:number):string;
        data:any;
    };
}


var x = new xxx();

function a(x:X):string{
    return  x.f("1") + x.f(1) + x.f.data;     
}

alert(a(x));
share|improve this answer
    
Downvoters: can you explain why this is a bad solution? –  Jean-Philippe Pellet May 7 '14 at 10:25

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