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suppose, I have a student class with roll number and name. I want to sort it out wrt roll number. I tried the following .Here is my code:

package CollectionDemo;
import java.util.*;


class student1 implements Comparable<student1>{
    int rollNo;
    String name;

    student1(int rollNo,String name){
        this.rollNo=rollNo;
        this.name=name;
    }
    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o){
        if((o instanceof student1) && (((student1)o).rollNo == rollNo)){
             return true;
        }
          else
        {
              return false;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode(){
        return 1;
    }

    public int compareTo(student1 s) {
        return s.rollNo;
    }

    public String toString(){
        return "["+rollNo+","+name+"]";
    }
}
public class treeSetDemo {
    public static void main(String... a){

        Set<student1> set=new TreeSet<student1>();
        set.add(new student1(102,"Anu"));
        set.add(new student1(101,"Tanu"));
        set.add(new student1(103,"Minu"));

        System.out.println("elements:"+set);

    }
}

o/p: elements:[[102,Anu], [101,Tanu], [103,Minu]]

so, its not sorting:( how to make it correct .

thanks for your help.

================================================

thanks for all your help. The following code runs fine, but now I want to know how it works, if i comment out equals and hashcode method.

package CollectionDemo;
import java.util.*;


class student1 implements Comparable<student1>{
    int rollNo;
    String name;

    student1(int rollNo,String name){
        this.rollNo=rollNo;
        this.name=name;
    }
   /* @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o){
        if((o instanceof student1) && (((student1)o).rollNo == rollNo)){
             return true;
        }
          else
        {
              return false;
        }
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode(){
        return 1;
    }
*/
    public int compareTo(student1 s) {
        System.out.println("hello:"+(this.rollNo-s.rollNo));
        return this.rollNo-s.rollNo;
    }

    public String toString(){
        return "["+rollNo+","+name+"]";
    }
}
public class treeSetDemo {
    public static void main(String... a){

        Set<student1> set=new TreeSet<student1>();
        set.add(new student1(102,"Anu"));
        set.add(new student1(101,"Tanu"));
        set.add(new student1(103,"Minu"));

        System.out.println("elements:"+set);

    }
}

OP: run: hello:-1 hello:1 elements:[[101,Tanu], [102,Anu], [103,Minu]] BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 0 seconds)

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

you have to change compareTo method in bellow way

 public int compareTo(student1 s) {
    if(s.rollNo == this.rollNo){
        return 0;
    }else if(s.rollNo > this.rollNo){
        return -1;
    }else{
        return 1;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
rollNo is a primitive type. –  Alex Stybaev Oct 30 '12 at 11:04
    
Check I have changed it to correct way –  abc123 Oct 30 '12 at 11:13
2  
@user1479853. Actually you don't need that if-else block. Just return the difference. Collections.sort method is just concerned about the sign of difference not necessarily -1, 0 or 1 –  Rohit Jain Oct 30 '12 at 11:20
    
Yes ,you just need comparison result , Only sign is important. –  neel.1708 Oct 30 '12 at 11:24
    
Don't just return the difference; that risks integer overflow, which leads to bugs. –  Louis Wasserman Oct 30 '12 at 14:05

- If you want to sort on the basis of only one attribute, then go with java.lang.Comparable<T> Intereface, along with Collections.sort(List l).

- But if you aim is to sort it on the basis of more then one attribute then go for java.util.Comparator<T> along with Collections.sort(List l, Comparator c).

Eg:

import java.util.Comparator;

public class Fruit implements Comparable<Fruit>{

    private String fruitName;
    private String fruitDesc;
    private int quantity;

    public Fruit(String fruitName, String fruitDesc, int quantity) {
        super();
        this.fruitName = fruitName;
        this.fruitDesc = fruitDesc;
        this.quantity = quantity;
    }

    public String getFruitName() {
        return fruitName;
    }
    public void setFruitName(String fruitName) {
        this.fruitName = fruitName;
    }
    public String getFruitDesc() {
        return fruitDesc;
    }
    public void setFruitDesc(String fruitDesc) {
        this.fruitDesc = fruitDesc;
    }
    public int getQuantity() {
        return quantity;
    }
    public void setQuantity(int quantity) {
        this.quantity = quantity;
    }

    public int compareTo(Fruit compareFruit) {

        int compareQuantity = ((Fruit) compareFruit).getQuantity(); 

        //ascending order
        return this.quantity - compareQuantity;

        //descending order
        //return compareQuantity - this.quantity;

    }

    public static Comparator<Fruit> FruitNameComparator 
                          = new Comparator<Fruit>() {

        public int compare(Fruit fruit1, Fruit fruit2) {

          String fruitName1 = fruit1.getFruitName().toUpperCase();
          String fruitName2 = fruit2.getFruitName().toUpperCase();

          //ascending order
          return fruitName1.compareTo(fruitName2);

          //descending order
          //return fruitName2.compareTo(fruitName1);
        }

    };
}
share|improve this answer

I think this implementation is close to recommended:

@Override
public int compareTo(Object other) {
    if(other == null || !(other instanceOf student)){
       throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    }
    student s = (student) other;
    if(this.rollNo > s.rollNo){
         return 1;
    } else if (this.rollNo < s.rollNo){
         return -1;
    } else {
         return 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you are using Comparable interface then your compareTo() method should return the comparison not equals method , Google comparable example.

Check this link

share|improve this answer
    
What do you mean by: - not equals method? There is nothing wrong with the equals method in OP code. –  Rohit Jain Oct 30 '12 at 11:13
    
I didn't say anything is wrong with equals ,I said for comparison you should use compareTo method to return the comparison result. –  neel.1708 Oct 30 '12 at 11:18

In your compareTo method, you are just returning the value of the object you are comparing to. You need to return the difference, of the attribute of the invoking instance and passed instance.

So, change your compareTo method to the below one: -

@Override
public int compareTo(student1 s) {
    return this.rollNo - s.rollNo;
}

NOTE: - Only sign is important for Collections.sort, so you don't really need an if-else block to return -1, 0, or 1. Just return the difference. That's all.


P.S : -

Your hashcode implementation is a very poor one. It will put every instances in the same bucket.

@Override
public int hashCode(){
    return 1;  // All the instances will have the same hashcode.
}

Ideally, you should use only those attributes to calculate the hashCode which you have used to compare your two instances, here its rollNo.

So, rather than returning simply a value 1, you can have some equations, that calculates your hashcode, taking into to consideration your rollNo and a large prime number also.

You can go through Effective Java - Item#9 for more explanation of this topic.


Now, that your code is working fine, lets move to your 2nd doubt.

equals and hashCode methods are not used when you want to compare two objects that will be used while sorting. We override equals and hashCode methods in order to check whether an instance is equal to another instance later on. So, compareTo method is not concerned with whether you have ocerrided equals ad hashCode method or not. And you can also infer from name as to what the two methods does, and can they be related or not.

Moreover, equals method is defined in Object class, whereas compareTo method is declared in Comparable interface. So, they are not interrelated.

Check the documentation of these methods: - Object#equals, Object#hashCode, and Comparable#compareTo

share|improve this answer
    
thanks Rohit. BTW if i take out equals and hashCode methods, then also it works fine. I am not able to understand the behaviour. –  Anushree Acharjee Oct 30 '12 at 13:55
    
@user1737079. equals and hashCode methods have other purpose. They are used to compare two instances based on some criteria. Here it will not matter. You will know it when you need it. :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 30 '12 at 15:12
    
I am comparing here two instances and the criteria is roll No. So, why equals and hashcode wont matter here :s ?? –  Anushree Acharjee Nov 6 '12 at 10:51
    
@AnushreeAcharjee.. equals and hashCode are used for checking the equality of two instances. For comparing purpose you need to implement Comparable and have a compareTo method in your class. –  Rohit Jain Nov 6 '12 at 10:53
    
thanks Rohit!! I have implemented Comparable and given compareTo method. Please check the edited code. –  Anushree Acharjee Nov 7 '12 at 4:23

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