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I have a static method which I am calling from an Asynctask in doInBackGround()

In the method there is this part of code:

    ArrayList<Message> messagesList = new ArrayList<Message>();
    if (!clearList) {
        messagesList.addAll(messages.getMessagesList());
            for (Message msg : messagesList) {
                if (msg.getId().length() == 0) {
                    messagesList.remove(msg);
                }
        }
    }

It is sometimes throwing 'Concurrent modification exception', I have tried declaring the method as 'synchronized' but it still didn't help, and I cannot declare the block synchronized, since it is a static method and there is no 'this' reference.

I have also tried to stop a running asynctask if I need to start another one, but it didn't help as well.

Help appreciated.

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Thank you for all the answers. –  meh Oct 30 '12 at 11:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This has nothing to do with synchronization. You're using an iterator to loop over messagesList, but then using remove to modify it during the iteration. You can't do that, because ArrayList's iterators fail when the list if modified during iteration. From the docs:

The iterators returned by this class's iterator and listIterator methods are fail-fast: if the list is structurally modified at any time after the iterator is created, in any way except through the iterator's own remove or add methods, the iterator will throw a ConcurrentModificationException.

Your enhanced for loop is just syntactic sugar around using an Iterator, so you can just make that explicit and then use the iterator's remove method:

Iterator<Message> it = messagesList.iterator();
while (it.hasNext()) {
    if (it.next().getId().length == 0) {
       it.remove();
    }
}

Alternately, you can just use a simple for loop running backward and indexing into the ArrayList (since get(int) is a cheap and constant-time operation on an ArrayList, which isn't true of all Lists):

int index;
for (index = messagesList.length - 1; index >= 0; --index) {
    if (messagesList.get(index).getId().length == 0) {
       messagesList.remove(index);
    }
}
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 for (Message msg : messagesList) {
                if (msg.getId().length() == 0) {
                    messagesList.remove(msg);
                }
        }

In this code you using messagesList at a time you are also remove data from messagesList thats why you facing error Concurrent modification exception..

Here better way for solved your issue. Copy All data in one arraylist for remove & remove all that data from Main List.

Message removeMsg = new ArrayList<Message>();
 for (Message msg : messagesList) {
                    if (msg.getId().length() == 0) {
                        removeMsg.add(msg);
                    }
            }

messagesList.removeAll(removeMsg);
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Seems a very roundabout way to approach it in view of other options. –  T.J. Crowder Oct 30 '12 at 22:29

Iterators returned by ArrayList is fail-fast in nature.

The iterators returned by this class's iterator and listIterator methods are fail-fast: if the list is structurally modified at any time after the iterator is created, in any way except through the iterator's own remove or add methods, the iterator will throw a ConcurrentModificationException. Thus, in the face of concurrent modification, the iterator fails quickly and cleanly, rather than risking arbitrary, non-deterministic behavior at an undetermined time in the future.

You can call iterator.remove(); and change loop based on iterator explicitly rather than implicitly.

ArrayList<Message> messagesList = new ArrayList<Message>();
    if (!clearList) {
        messagesList.addAll(messages.getMessagesList());
        for (ListIterator<Message> iterator = messagesList.listIterator();iterator.hasNext();) {
            Message message = iterator.next();
            if (message.getId().length() == 0) {
                iterator.remove();
            }
        }
    }

References:

  1. The For-Each Loop
  2. ArrayList Java docs
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Thank you for the answer, I will use the iterator. –  meh Oct 30 '12 at 11:17
    
@AmitD. Why don't you just provide the link to your answer rather than posting it in each question that appear. Practically, you have copied this answer on 4 different questions asking the same thing, without any change whatsoever. If you see the share link below your answer, that is exactly what you need to share your answers. –  Rohit Jain Oct 30 '12 at 11:22
    
@AmitD. Then post it as comment, and it should belong there only. Anyways You're welcome :) –  Rohit Jain Oct 30 '12 at 11:26

The for loop is potentially modifying the list over which it is iterating. This is the cause of the exception. The fact that the modification is based on a condition is the reason it does not occur all of the time as the list is not necessarily modified.

Using an Iterator is a possible solution, which provides a remove() method.

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You should use Synchronize keyword for this class because static method doesn't belong to any instance

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- Your problem is not associated with synchronization, but the problem of ConcurrentModification you are facing is used to protect collection from taking in object of wrong type.

Eg:

Preventing a Cat object enter into a Collection of Dog type.

- You can solve this problem by using Iterator

ArrayList<Message> messagesList = new ArrayList<Message>();

Iterator<Message> itr = messagesList.iterator();

while(itr.hasNext()){

 Message m = itr.next();

 itr.remove();   // Its remove() method of Iterator NOT ArrayList's

}
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