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I need to walk through a folder with approximately ten thousand files. My old vbscript is very slow in handling this. Since I've started using Ruby and Python since then, I made a benchmark between the three scripting languages to see which would be the best fit for this job.

The results of the tests below on a subset of 4500 files on a shared network are

Python: 106 seconds
Ruby: 5 seconds
Vbscript: 124 seconds

That Vbscript would be slowest was no surprise but I can't explain the difference between Ruby and Python. Is my test for Python not optimal? Is there a faster way to do this in Python?

The test for thumbs.db is just for the test, in reality there are more tests to do.

I needed something that checks every file on the path and doesn't produce too much output to not disturb the timing. The results are a bit different each run but not by much.

#python2.7.0
import os

def recurse(path):
  for (path, dirs, files) in os.walk(path):
    for file in files:
      if file.lower() == "thumbs.db":
        print (path+'/'+file)

if __name__ == '__main__':
  import timeit
  path = '//server/share/folder/'
  print(timeit.timeit('recurse("'+path+'")', setup="from __main__ import recurse", number=1))
'vbscript5.7
set oFso = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
const path = "\\server\share\folder"
start = Timer
myLCfilename="thumbs.db"

sub recurse(folder)
  for each file in folder.Files
    if lCase(file.name) = myLCfilename then
      wscript.echo file
    end if
  next
  for each subfolder in folder.SubFolders
    call Recurse(subfolder)
  next
end Sub

set folder = oFso.getFolder(path)
recurse(folder)
wscript.echo Timer-start
#ruby1.9.3
require 'benchmark'

def recursive(path, bench)
  bench.report(path) do
    Dir["#{path}/**/**"].each{|file| puts file if File.basename(file).downcase == "thumbs.db"}
  end
end

path = '//server/share/folder/'
Benchmark.bm {|bench| recursive(path, bench)}

EDIT: since i suspected the print caused a delay i tested the scripts with printing all 4500 files and also printing none, the difference remains, R:5 P:107 in the first case and R:4.5 P:107 in the latter

EDIT2: based on the answers and comments here a Python version that in some cases could run faster by skipping folders

import os

def recurse(path):
  for (path, dirs, files) in os.walk(path):
    for file in files:
      if file.lower() == "thumbs.db":
        print (path+'/'+file)

def recurse2(path):
    for (path, dirs, files) in os.walk(path):
        for dir in dirs:
            if dir in ('comics'):
                dirs.remove(dir)
        for file in files:
            if file.lower() == "thumbs.db":
                print (path+'/'+file)


if __name__ == '__main__':
  import timeit
  path = 'f:/'
  print(timeit.timeit('recurse("'+path+'")', setup="from __main__ import recurse", number=1)) 
#6.20102692
  print(timeit.timeit('recurse2("'+path+'")', setup="from __main__ import recurse2", number=1)) 
#2.73848228
#ruby 5.7
share|improve this question
1  
Are you sure that this behaviour is not connected to some network cache policy? The speed differences between Python and Ruby shouldn't be so massive... –  Paolo Moretti Oct 30 '12 at 12:03
1  
This might be silly, but have you thought of trying to walk through the output of glob.glob (using os.path.basename)? I doubt it would be faster, but it might be. As far as I can tell, that seems a little closer to what you're doing in ruby. With the python script, you probably have a decent amount of overhead inquiring the filesystem whether a give name is a directory, or whether it's a file ... –  mgilson Oct 30 '12 at 12:16
1  
@mgilson, @peter: The glob.glob thing was a good idea, since it gave me a possible hint. The /**/** wildcard in glob.glob() only seems to go two directory levels deep, while os.walk() will enter directories up to arbitrary levels. Are you sure the Ruby wildcard pattern is right. A count of the number of results will probably give you a good idea if the results are identical or not. –  Chinmay Kanchi Oct 30 '12 at 12:48
2  
@Doug: tested it on a local disk with +166000 files and here the difference is less: R:12 and P:16 –  peter Oct 30 '12 at 13:29
2  
Can you add to your question the comment that you addressed to @Doug when you said: tested it on a local disk with +166000 files and here the difference is less: R:12 and P:16 because i believe that with what you just found you can narrow your question to the difference between Python's os.walk('//network-filepath') and Ruby Dir["//network-filepath"]. –  mouad Oct 30 '12 at 15:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The Ruby implementation for Dir is in C (the file dir.c, according to this documentation). However, the Python equivalent is implemented in Python.

It's not surprising that Python is less performant than C, but the approach used in Python gives a little more flexibility - for example, you could skip entire subtrees named e.g. '.svn', '.git', '.hg' while traversing a directory hierarchy.

Most of the time, the Python implementation is fast enough.

Update: The skipping of files/subdirs doesn't affect the traversal rate at all, but the overall time taken to process a directory tree could certainly be reduced because you avoid having to traverse potentially large subtrees of the main tree. The time saved is of course proportional to how much you skip. In your case, which looks like folders of images, it's unlikely you would save much time (unless the images were under revision control, when skipping subtrees owned by the revision control system might have some impact).

Additional update: Skipping folders is done by changing the dirs value in place:

for root, dirs, files in os.walk(path):
    for skip in ('.hg', '.git', '.svn', '.bzr'):
        if skip in dirs:
            dirs.remove(skip)
        # Now process other stuff at this level, i.e.
        # in directory "root". The skipped folders
        # won't be recursed into.
share|improve this answer
1  
I think that was the point. He wants it to go through all the files and perform some operation while producing minimal output. He does the same thing in the Ruby code, as far as I can tell. –  Chinmay Kanchi Oct 30 '12 at 11:47
1  
@Chinmay: Thanks for pointing out my reading deficiency. I updated my answer after reading more carefully :-) –  Vinay Sajip Oct 31 '12 at 17:46
    
@Vinay, and does this skipping affect the speed ? does the search go faster when you skip the subtrees ? In Ruby you can also .reject some of the results but your search won't go faster –  peter Oct 31 '12 at 20:27
    
@Vinay, could you show how to skip folders in Python so that i can test if they are processed or not ? In Ruby they are processed anyway and a'm not that far in Python already –  peter Nov 1 '12 at 11:03
    
Vinay, had to adapt the code, see my edited question, thanks for the help, in my case on a networkshare and without folders that i can exclude i'm better of taking Ruby, hope this helps a lot of Ruby AND Python beginners –  peter Nov 1 '12 at 16:42

I setup directory structure with the following locally:

for i in $(seq 1 4500); do
    if [[ $i -lt 100 ]]; then
        dir="$(for j in $(seq 1 $i); do echo -n $i/;done)"
        mkdir -p "$dir"
        touch ${dir}$i
    else
        touch $i
    fi
done

This creates 99 files with paths that are 1-99 levels deep and 4401 files in the root of the directory structure.

I used the following ruby script:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
require 'benchmark'

def recursive(path, bench)
  bench.report(path) do
    Dir["#{path}/**/**"]
  end
end

path = 'files'
Benchmark.bm {|bench| recursive(path, bench)}

I got the following result:

           user     system      total        real
    files/  0.030000   0.090000   0.120000 (  0.108562)

I use the following python script using os.walk:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import os
import timeit

def path_recurse(path):
    for (path, dirs, files) in os.walk(path):
      for folder in dirs:
          yield '{}/{}'.format(path, folder)
      for filename in files:
          yield '{}/{}'.format(path, filename)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    path = 'files'
    print(timeit.timeit('[i for i in path_recurse("'+path+'")]', setup="from __main__ import path_recurse", number=1))

I got the following result:

    0.250478029251

So, it looks like ruby is still performing better. It'd be interesting to see how this one performs on your fileset on the network share.

It would probably also be interesting to see this script run on python3 and with jython and maybe even with pypy.

share|improve this answer
    
on what OS did you perform your test Warren ? on your test the difference for local is even bigger then my test –  peter Oct 31 '12 at 8:42
    
I ran these tests on an Ubuntu 10.04 virtual machine. –  Warren T. Feb 10 '13 at 23:13

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