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I'm having an error message that tells me this:

'BankAccount.account' does not contain a definition for 'withdraw'.

Here's my code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace BankAccounts
{
class account
{
    protected string name;
    protected float balance;
    public account(string n, float b)
    {
        name = n;
        balance = b;
    }

    public void deposit(float amt)
    {
        balance -= amt;
    }

    public void display()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Name: {0}. Balance: {1}.", name, balance);
    }
}

class savingaccount : account
{
    static int accno = 1000;
    int trans;
    public savingaccount(string s, float b) : base(s, b)
    {
        trans = 0;
        accno++;
    }
    public void withdraw (float amt)
    {
        if (trans >= 10)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Number of transactions exceed 10.");
            return;
        }
        if (balance - amt < 500)
            Console.WriteLine("Below minimum balance.");
        else
        {
            base.withdraw(amt);
            trans++;
        }
    }
    public void deposit(float amt)
    {
        if (trans >= 10)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Number of transactions exceed 10.");
            return;
        }
        base.deposit(amt);
        trans++;
    }
    public void display()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Name: {0}. Account no.: {1}. Balance: {2}", name, accno,        balance);
    }
}

class currentaccount : account
{
    static int accno = 1000;
    public currentaccount(string s, float b) : base(s, b)
    {
        accno++;
    }
    public void withdraw(float amt)
    {
        if (balance - amt < 0)
            Console.WriteLine("No balance in account.");
        else
            balance -= amt;
    }
    public void display()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Name: {0}. Account no.: {1}. Balance: {2}.", name, accno, balance);
    }
}

}

I don't understand why it doesn't recognize it. It is a method in the class savingaccount.

share|improve this question
1  
There is no .withdraw method in the account (it's best to capitalize your class names by the way), yet your derived classes have them - why not include a signature for .withdraw in the base class? Can you post how you are using this code? The error message is correct as far as I can see. –  Paul Aldred-Bann Oct 30 '12 at 11:57
    
it looks like a lot of these methods should actually be virtual/override, btw - and doesn't "deposit" usually increase the balance? –  Marc Gravell Oct 30 '12 at 11:59

6 Answers 6

You're calling

base.withdraw(amt);

from your class savingsaccount. But the base class (account) has no such method. So the compiler is absolutely correct.

share|improve this answer

It looks like you simply missed the method from the base type:

public virtual void Deposit(float amt)
{
    balance += amt;
}
public virtual void Withdraw(float amt)
{
    balance -= amt;
}

Note I changed "deposit" to +=, and made the method virtual so that subclasses can override the method, which is (I strongly suspect) what the intent is here. Additionally, float is a really bad choice for storing money. decimal might be a better choice. As a stylistic change, I also capitalized the names.

share|improve this answer

I assume your intention was to define the basic withdraw method in the base account class, so that it would be inherited by both savingaccount and currentaccount. You should declare it as virtual in order to allow it to be overridden by the derived classes, if required.

class account
{
    public virtual void withdraw(float amt)
    {
        if (balance - amt < 0)
            Console.WriteLine("No balance in account.");
        else
            balance -= amt;
    }
}

The currentaccount class presumably does not need to modify the logic of this inherited method, so you can omit it altogether. On the other hand, in your savingaccount class, you can override the method to implement your custom behaviour:

class savingaccount : account
{
    public override void withdraw(float amt)
    {
        if (trans >= 10)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Number of transactions exceed 10.");
            return;
        }
        if (balance - amt < 500)
            Console.WriteLine("Below minimum balance.");
        else
        {
            base.withdraw(amt);
            trans++;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You call base.withdraw(amt) in your savingaccount class, but the base class account does not define this method.

share|improve this answer

If you look closely, you'll see that your account class in fact doesn't have a withdraw method.

I'd guess you meant to have your account class contain a virtual method withdraw, defined like this: public virtual void withdraw(float amt) { ... }

Then, in your inherited classes you'd want to override this method, like so:

class currentaccount : account
{
    public override void withdraw(float amt)
    {
        ...
        base.withdraw(amt)
        ...
    }
    ...
}

There's also a naming style issue with your code, but this is probably not in the scope of this question :)

share|improve this answer
1  
If account.withdraw were abstract then base.withdraw() wouldn't work either. –  Joey Oct 30 '12 at 12:00
    
Right. I'll fix it up. –  MisterMetaphor Oct 30 '12 at 12:01

As everybody pointed out allready, you should declare the withdraw() method on your base class acocunt, so all the derived classes can inherit the method.

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