Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In the following db, I need all users and their locations, without duplicates, and with those in NJ listed first.
(If they have a NJ address, I do not need their other addresses. Database simplified for clarity).

> table address,

|  id  |  state |   City   |
|------|--------|----------|
|  01  |   NY   |  Gotham  |
|  02  |   NY   |  Uye     |
|  03  |   NJ   |  Hoboken |
|  04  |   NJ   |  Newark  |

> table contact

|  user  |  address  |
|--------|-----------|
|   01   |     01    |
|   02   |     02    |
|   02   |     03    |
|   03   |     04    |

Below are some of my attempts and their outputs. From what I have read [I have spent hours on this], I think this is called a ambiguous GROUP BY query, and is only allowed by MySQL.

I can't figure out the correct way to do this, though. Please help!

DESIRED RESULT:

|  user  |  state  |
|--------|---------|
|   02   |   NJ    |
|   03   |   NJ    |
|   01   |   NY    |

OTHER ATTEMPTS:

SELECT user, state FROM contact, address WHERE id = address;
// Duplicate users, and addresses I do not need.

|  user  |  state  |
|--------|---------|
|   01   |   NY    |
|   02   |   NY    |
|   02   |   NJ    |
|   03   |   NJ    |  

SELECT user, state FROM contact, address WHERE id = address GROUP BY user;
// NY address. I need the NJ address.

|  user  |  state  |
|--------|---------|
|   01   |   NY    |
|   02   |   NY    |
|   03   |   NJ    |

SELECT user, state FROM contact, address WHERE id = address GROUP BY user HAVING state = 'NJ';
//Worse, now I lose my NY users, and one of my NJ users doesn't even show 

|  user  |  state  |
|--------|---------|
|   03   |   NJ    |
share|improve this question
    
so what will be your desired results then? – John Woo Oct 30 '12 at 12:14
    
I think with the data included, the desired result is actually #2. – Joachim Isaksson Oct 30 '12 at 12:21
    
@ John Woo and Joachim Corrected the dataset and added desired output – SamGoody Oct 30 '12 at 12:25
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It may not be pretty, but this solution works. I've updated the query here to reflect changes in the fiddle:

SELECT user, state, `state` LIKE 'NJ' ismatch
FROM contact, address WHERE id = address
AND (state = 'NJ' OR `user` NOT IN 
    (SELECT `user` FROM contact, address WHERE address = id AND `state` LIKE 'NJ'))
GROUP BY user
ORDER BY ismatch DESC;

Simple explanation: Join every user with his address where the address is in NJ or with any address of his if he has no addresses in NJ. The GROUP BY is needed to prevent duplicate users from showing up in the results.

Essentially what the problem boils down to is wanting to retrieve a matching address for a user if it exists, and otherwise just to get any address for that user. Thus the second condition in the where clause, which will pull an NJ address only if that user has one, otherwise it will just take the first normally. The ismatch field is for sorting purposes.

Note: I originally wrote this using JOINs between the tables. They have been removed for clarity purposes.

Link to SQL Fiddle

EDIT: It was pointed out to me that this solution does not work in all cases (see comments). To fix this, I added a GROUP BY, and now it appears to work. I also replaced the CASE with a simple comparison to improve performance: SQLFiddle

In addition, an alternate answer has been suggested to me by someone I know with experience in database management. His suggestion wast to do it in two queries (at least), so I built those queries and used a UNION:

SELECT user, state, 1 ismatch FROM contact, address
WHERE id = address AND state = 'NJ' GROUP BY user
UNION
SELECT user, state, 0 ismatch FROM contact, address
WHERE id = address AND `user` NOT IN (SELECT `user` FROM contact, address WHERE address = id AND `state` LIKE 'NJ')
GROUP BY user ORDER BY ismatch DESC

Simple Explanation: Fetch every user with an NJ address, then fetch every user with any address if he has no NJ addresses, and UNION the two result sets together. GROUP BY is used in both queries to prevent duplicates.

share|improve this answer
    
If I understand correctly, this also involves two queries, and a comparison of the results. Is that as efficient as the union in AnadPhadke' answer? Is it better in other ways? – SamGoody Oct 30 '12 at 12:58
    
@SamGoody If the optimizer does a good job, it may merge the queries into one. You can use EXPLAIN to figure out if it does. The query may give duplicates if the user has more than one NJ address or more than one address of which none is in NJ. – Joachim Isaksson Oct 30 '12 at 17:53
    
Verified that the query give duplicates if the user has more than one NJ address or more than one address of which none is in NJ. :( – SamGoody Oct 31 '12 at 11:15
    
Is GROUP BY in any way guaranteed to return the first row in each group in MySQL? I keep seeing answers relying on that, but I can't find any documentation that says so. Other databases won't let you GROUP BY without aggregate functions, but MySQL seems to not require that. – Joachim Isaksson Nov 1 '12 at 19:14
    
@JoachimIsaksson, in this case it doesn't matter. The desired result is to get a list of all NJ users first, then a list of everyone with no NJ address after that. My method assures that any user with an NJ address will only show up in the result set with his NJ addresses, and anyone without will only show up without an NJ address. Therefore, unless I've missed something critical, no user with an NJ address will show up with a non-NJ address, and there is no risk of him being listed as not in NJ. – Meir Nov 2 '12 at 9:37

A bit belated answer and sort of long winded, but standard SQL;

SELECT DISTINCT c1.user,a1.state,a1.city
FROM contact c1
LEFT JOIN contact c2 
  ON c1.user = c2.user AND c1.address<>c2.address
JOIN address a1
  ON a1.id=c1.address
LEFT JOIN address a2 
  ON a2.id=c2.address AND
     ( a1.state<> 'NJ' AND a2.state='NJ' OR
       a1.state=a2.state AND a1.id>a2.id )
GROUP BY c1.user,a1.state,a1.city
HAVING MAX(a2.id) IS NULL

SQLfiddle here.

EDIT: Added a fix for the duplicate case you found. A cursory explanation of the query;

For each user, it will go through all combinations of contact/address (c1/a1) and compare them with all other (a2/c2) for the same user using a left join that sets a2.id to NULL if a1/c1 is "better". If an address isn't "worse" in any comparison, it will be the address kept.

share|improve this answer
    
Firstly, I am very impressed. You've just taught me alot about joins. Unfortunately, if some user has three address, all three show, instead of just the one in NJ: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/7607a/1 (Added a 3rd address for user #2. Can't seem to work out how to further extend these joins.). – SamGoody Oct 31 '12 at 11:12
    
@SamGoody Updated the query. – Joachim Isaksson Oct 31 '12 at 12:02

try this:

SELECT user, state FROM contact, address WHERE id = address 
and state='NJ'
union
SELECT min(user), state FROM contact, address WHERE id = address 
and state<>'NJ'
group by state

SQLFIDDLE DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but it only shows two users. See the "desired result" in the question - I need all users, just for the "other fields" taken in by the group by to follow criterion – SamGoody Oct 30 '12 at 12:33
    
try the updated query and demo – AnandPhadke Oct 30 '12 at 12:34
1  
I'm not sure trusting GROUP BY to take the first row found is a safe bet. – Joachim Isaksson Oct 30 '12 at 12:38
    
In testing, if there are more than 1 NY user, only the first is retrieved, whereas we need all NY users. [This is true even when I remove the min() from your query - I don't really follow what the min() is for.] – SamGoody Oct 31 '12 at 8:58
    
yeah in mysql that min is not required.Its right. – AnandPhadke Oct 31 '12 at 9:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.