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I have many IF sentences that each start a function.
Is there an obvious way to write this code much simpler?
Every IF starts different function, but it still looks like an overkill.

    if ($this->machine == '' AND $this->date_from == '' AND $this->date_to == '' AND $this->date_like == '' AND $this->article_or_tool == '') {
        $this->AllTime();
    }
    if ($this->machine <> 0 AND $this->date_from == '' AND $this->date_to == '' AND $this->date_like == '' AND $this->article_or_tool == '') {
        $this->ByMachine();
    }
    if ($this->machine == '' AND $this->date_from <> 0 AND $this->date_to <> 0 AND $this->date_like == '' AND $this->article_or_tool == '') {
        $this->ByDate();
    }
    if ($this->machine <> 0 AND $this->date_from <> 0 AND $this->date_to <> 0 AND $this->date_like == '' AND $this->article_or_tool == '') {
        $this->ByMachineByDate();
    }
    if ($this->machine == '' AND $this->date_from == '' AND $this->date_to == '' AND $this->date_like <> 0 AND $this->article_or_tool == '') {
        $this->ByDateLike();
    }
    if ($this->machine <> 0 AND $this->date_from == '' AND $this->date_to == '' AND $this->date_like <> 0 AND $this->article_or_tool == '') {
        $this->ByMachineByDateLike();
    }
    if ($this->machine == '' AND $this->date_from == '' AND $this->date_to == '' AND $this->date_like == '' AND $this->article_or_tool <> 0) {
        $this->ByArticle();
    }
    if ($this->machine <> 0 AND $this->date_from == '' AND $this->date_to == '' AND $this->date_like == '' AND $this->article_or_tool <> 0) {
        $this->ByMachineByArticle();
    }
    if ($this->machine == '' AND $this->date_from <> 0 AND $this->date_to <> 0 AND $this->date_like == '' AND $this->article_or_tool <> 0) {
        $this->ByDateByArticle();
    }
    if ($this->machine == '' AND $this->date_from == '' AND $this->date_to == '' AND $this->date_like <> 0 AND $this->article_or_tool <> 0) {
        $this->ByDateLikeByArticle();
    }
    if ($this->machine <> 0 AND $this->date_from <> 0 AND $this->date_to <> 0 AND $this->date_like == '' AND $this->article_or_tool <> 0) {
        $this->ByMachineByDateByArticle();
    }
    if ($this->machine <> 0 AND $this->date_from == '' AND $this->date_to == '' AND $this->date_like <> 0 AND $this->article_or_tool <> 0) {
        $this->ByMachineByDateLikeByArticle();
    }

SOLUTION
Here is my code after refactoring it:

function MethodPicker() {
    $machine            = $this->machine            <> 0;
    $date_from          = $this->date_from          <> 0;
    $date_to            = $this->date_to            <> 0;
    $date_like          = $this->date_like          <> 0;
    $article_or_tool    = $this->article_or_tool    <> 0;

    $decision  = array($machine, $date_from, $date_to, $date_like, $article_or_tool);
    $decisions = array(
                    'AllTime' =>                        array(false,    false,  false,  false,  false   ),
                    'ByMachine' =>                      array(true,     false,  false,  false,  false   ),
                    'ByDate' =>                         array(false,    true,   true,   false,  false   ),
                    'ByMachineByDate' =>                array(true,     true,   true,   false,  false   ),
                    'ByDateLike' =>                     array(false,    false,  false,  true,   false   ),
                    'ByMachineByDateLike' =>            array(true,     false,  false,  true,   false   ),
                    'ByArticle' =>                      array(false,    false,  false,  false,  true    ),
                    'ByMachineByArticle' =>             array(true,     false,  false,  false,  true    ),
                    'ByDateByArticle' =>                array(false,    true,   true,   false,  true    ),
                    'ByDateLikeByArticle' =>            array(false,    false,  false,  true,   true    ),
                    'ByMachineByDateByArticle' =>       array(true,     true,   true,   false,  true    ),
                    'ByMachineByDateLikeByArticle' =>   array(true,     false,  false,  true,   true    ),
    );
    $method = array_keys($decisions, $decision, true);
    $method && list($method) = $method;
    $method && $this->$method();
}
share|improve this question
    
Some part of your code is missing. Which types are these properties? String? Integer? Float? Many? –  hakre Oct 30 '12 at 12:36
    
Big thanks to everybody who contributed! –  mend Nov 1 '12 at 11:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all I would do some standard refactorings. No idea why I do it that way, but here is what:

  1. Replace the properties with local variables, like

    $machine = $this->machine;
    
  2. Same would work for the conditions however looking closer to the conditions it becomes clear that you have two states only for each variable, so this is actually one condition per variable only (see Type Juggling) which results in true or false. Assign the condition, instead:

    $machine = $this->machine == '' || $this->machine == 0;
    

(Credits go to martinstoeckli for the correct condition)

This would be a start. The if clauses until now would have already changed and would be more compact. However, why stop here? There is a decision that is current:

$decision  = [$machine, $date_from, $date_to, $date_like, $article_or_tool];

And there is a set of decisions to choose from:

$decisions = [
    'AllTime' => [true, true, true, true, true],
    ...
];

So all that needs to be done is to find the decision and execute the method:

$method = array_keys($decisions, $decision, true);
$method && $this->$method();

The if block has been turned into a matrix. The function has been mapped to one state of it.

You loose the names on the fields, however, you could solve that with a comment:

    $decisions = [
        //            machine  from  to    like  article
        'AllTime' => [true   , true, true, true, true],
        ...
    ];

At a glance:

$machine = $this->machine == '' || $this->machine == 0;
... # 4 more times

$decision  = [$machine, $date_from, $date_to, $date_like, $article_or_tool];

$decisions = [
    'AllTime' => [true, true, true, true, true],
    ... # 11 more times
];

$method = array_keys($decisions, $decision, true);
$method && $this->$method();

If the class this is in represent a value object, I suggest you move the decisions into a type of it's own and then just use that decision type as a single method object. Will enable you later on to do different sets of decisions more easily.

share|improve this answer
    
This is very similar to stackoverflow.com/a/13139477/367456 who came to a comparable solution (earlier). Didn't notice it when writing this answer, so probably good to see two opinions in a similar directions. –  hakre Oct 30 '12 at 14:46
    
Looks nice. I myself am not sure, if the matrix is really the better solution than the ifs, it may be a bit more difficult to understand. To use the array as a dictionary with the function names is a good idea, it makes it even more straightforward. –  martinstoeckli Oct 30 '12 at 16:43
    
I'm not so sure either if the matrix is that fine. This could probably more nicely solved having $this as value object, then one object for a condition and then checking if a condition matches, then calling a method. However could be overhead, too. The main problem I'd say is what the OP does in the first place ;) –  hakre Oct 30 '12 at 17:18
    
Thank you very much. This is awesome! –  mend Oct 31 '12 at 14:28

Maybe you really need all this decisions, but you could make it a bit easier to read. Instead of writing many times $this->machine == '' inside the if statement, you could set this value to a meaningful variable first.

$machineIsEmpty = $this->machine == '' || $this->machine == 0;
$dateFromIsEmpty = $this->date_from == '' || $this->machine == 0;
...

if ($machineIsEmpty && $dateFromIsEmpty && $dateToIsEmpty && $dateLikeIsEmpty && $articleOrToolIsEmpty)
{
  $this->AllTime();
}
else if (!$machineIsEmpty && $dateFromIsEmpty && $dateToIsEmpty && $dateLikeIsEmpty && $articleOrToolIsEmpty)
{
  $this->ByMachine();
}
...

In this example i assume two things: first i suspect that you want to handle both the values '' and 0 as not set. I'm not sure about this, because there is no case where you did anything with the value 0.

Second i assume that if one function was called, you do not want to call further functions, so i added an else before the next if.

Nesting the if statements would in my opinion make the code more difficult to read, because you have to remember in which level of if statement you currently are.


An alternative approach would be to use a decision-matrix. You can write an array holding all possible combinations, and each combination knows the function name.

$myObject = new TestClass();
$myObject->DoAction($machineIsSet, $dateFromIsSet, $dateToIsSet, $dateLikeIsSet, $articleToolIsSet);

class TestClass
{
  private $actionMatrix = array(
    //    machine, dateFrom, dateTo, dateLike, articleOrTool, action
    array(false,   false,    false,  false,    false,         'AllTime'),
    array(true,    false,    false,  false,    false,         'ByMachine')
  );

  public function DoAction($machine, $dateFrom, $dateTo, $dateLike, $articleOrTool)
  {
    foreach($this->actionMatrix as $action)
    {
      if (($action[0] == $machine) && ($action[1] == $dateFrom) && ($action[2] == $dateTo) && ($action[3] == $dateLike) && ($action[4] == $articleOrToolLike))
      {
        $functionName = $action[5];
        $this->$functionName(); // call the function
        break;
      }
    }
    // no action found, maybe we want some error handling here?
  }

  public function AllTime()
  {
    echo('AllTime');
  }

  public function ByMachine()
  {
    echo('ByMachine');
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - I came to some similar conclusion. Improving the variable situation first helps to spot patterns. I solved it little differently for the matrix / function mapping, might be interesting for you: stackoverflow.com/a/13141207/367456 - And I did a mistake with the conditional expression. Fixing... ;) –  hakre Oct 30 '12 at 14:36

A lot of it is repetition, so you could nest the conditions to remove redundancy, for example:

if ($this->machine == '') {
  // do everything requiring empty 'machine' string
  // remove condition from all subsequent ifs in this context
} else if ($this-> machine <> 0) {

}

I don't have the time or the inclination to go through all of that code and actually do this for you, but that's an idea that should provide enough information for you to implement as an exercise for the reader. (:

share|improve this answer

Sometimes it is not possible if your conditions are different, but in this case you can start from grouping your if()s, as many share the same condition. For example instead of having tons of

if( $this->machine <> 0 AND .... )

you could group them all together:

if( $this->machine <> 0 ) {
    // all related ifs there
}

And then proceed with next "level" of conditions. While this may NOT reduce total number of if()s, your code will be much more readable than it is now.

share|improve this answer

As I see you have a convention naming your methods. If I have such code and such conventions, I would refactor it using calling method by name, in this way your code will be very short, easy to read and maintainable

   $method = '';

    if (this->machine <> 0) $method.="ByMachine";
    if ($this->date_from <> 0 AND $this->date_to <> 0) $method.="ByDate"
    .....
    //here you have full $method name ByMachineByDateByArticle or ByMachineByDateByArticle etc
    if($method){ 
       call_user_func_array(array($this, $method));
    }
share|improve this answer

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