Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have built a simple accordian type side menu and looking at it, it's pretty heavy for what it does. What methods can I learn to reduce the amount of code and time to execute if any?

I am mainly asking this as a learning point.

$('#one').css("height", "22");
$('#dtwo').css("height", "22"); 
$('#three').css("height", "22");   
    $('#t1').click(function() {
      if ($('#one').hasClass("extended")) {
        $('#one').stop(true, true).animate({height: '22px'},500);
        $('#one').removeClass("extended");
        $('#a1').stop(true, true).animate({opacity: '1'},500);
      } else {
        $('#one').animate({height: '120' + 'px'},500);
        $('#one').addClass("extended");
        $('#a1').animate({opacity: '0'},300);
      }
});

$('#t2').click(function() {
      if ($('#dtwo').hasClass("extended")) {
        $('#dtwo').stop(true, true).animate({height: '22px'},500);
        $('#dtwo').removeClass("extended");
        $('#a2').stop(true, true).animate({opacity: '1'},500);
      } else {
        var height = 0;
        $(this).closest("div").children().each(function(){
           height += $(this).outerHeight(true);
        });
        $('#dtwo').animate({height: height + 5 + 'px'},500);
        $('#dtwo').addClass("extended");
        $('#a2').animate({opacity: '0'},300);
      }
});

 $('#t3').click(function() {
      if ($('#three').hasClass("extended")) {
        $('#three').stop(true, true).animate({height: '22px'},500);
        $('#three').removeClass("extended");
        $('#a3').stop(true, true).animate({opacity: '1'},500);
      } else {
        $('#three').animate({height: '270px'},500);
        $('#three').addClass("extended");
        $('#a3').animate({opacity: '0'},300);
      }
});

 $('#a1').click(function() {
      if ($('#one').hasClass("extended")) {
        $('#one').stop(true, true).animate({height: '22px'},500);
        $('#one').removeClass("extended");
        $('#a1').stop(true, true).animate({opacity: '1'},500);
      } else {
        $('#one').animate({height: '120px'},500);
        $('#one').addClass("extended");
        $('#a1').animate({opacity: '0'},300);
      }
});

$('#a2').click(function() {
      if ($('#dtwo').hasClass("extended")) {
        $('#dtwo').stop(true, true).animate({height: '22px'},500);
        $('#dtwo').removeClass("extended");
        $('#a2').stop(true, true).animate({opacity: '1'},500);
      } else {
        $('#dtwo').animate({height: '120px'},500);
        $('#dtwo').addClass("extended");
        $('#a2').animate({opacity: '0'},300);
      }
});

 $('#a3').click(function() {
      if ($('#three').hasClass("extended")) {
        $('#three').stop(true, true).animate({height: '22px'},500);
        $('#three').removeClass("extended");
        $('#a3').stop(true, true).animate({opacity: '1'},500);
      } else {
        $('#three').animate({height: '270px'},500);
        $('#three').addClass("extended");
        $('#a3').animate({opacity: '0'},300);
      }
});
share|improve this question
1  
If CSS3 animations were an option, would you consider using those instead? –  Jeffrey Sweeney Oct 30 '12 at 12:33
1  
@JeffreySweeney I suppose, I havent really looked into CSS3 animations much but I imagine IE7 + possibly 8 wouldnt play ball? –  zomboble Oct 30 '12 at 12:39
1  
@zombole Indeed, even IE 9 can't. The trick would be to have the accordion work (jump to position) regardless of whether the animation does. It's much more maintainable. But, seeing as this is a homework problem, I'm assuming that your professor is requesting an animating accordion above all else. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Oct 30 '12 at 12:44
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You will get rid of the most part of your code by creating a single callback-function that you can use for every click-event handler, as they are identical, apart from the selector. That way you don't need to repeat a lot of code. It becomes easier to maintain, will be less error prone and take a lot less space.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Cache the elements, For example:

  if ($('#one').hasClass("extended")) {
    $('#one').stop(true, true).animate({height: '22px'},500);
    $('#one').removeClass("extended");

Change to:

var one = $('#one');
  if (one.hasClass("extended")) {
    one.stop(true, true).animate({height: '22px'},500);
    one.removeClass("extended");
....
...

One more tip is the variables names. Don't name the elements one,two, t1, a2
Give the elements and variables meaningful names.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks for the comment, does 'caching' the elements improve execution or is it more of a programming concept/thing of neater and more readable code? And yes your right on the naming conventions! I need to start doing it properly and not only when I can be bothered :P I'm drastically trying to improve my standards. –  zomboble Oct 30 '12 at 12:37
    
@zomboble each time you call jquery to access an element, it constructs an object. By calling it once and saving it to a variable, you create the object once, and then reuse it each time you need to reference that element. It especially becomes important when you use it in loops, or events that fire a lot, like onscroll. –  Isaac Fife Oct 30 '12 at 13:02
    
@IsaacFife. Not accurate, caching the jQuery object saves the DOM queries. –  gdoron Oct 30 '12 at 16:21
    
@zomboble. See my answer above. –  gdoron Oct 30 '12 at 16:32
add comment

The biggest thing to learn in order to avoid the duplication of the same code using specific ID's is adding common class names to the different components of your widgets or modules.

This enables you to run the saem code to handle multiple instances of a widget in page

Simpified example since I can't see your markup to know what each ID represents

$('.myMainWidgetClass').click(function(){
      var $thisWidget=$(this) ; /* store this instance of widget */
       /* remove active class on all the other main widgets*/
      $('.myMainWidgetClass.activeClass').removeClass('activeClass'); 
      /* add the active class to this instance*/
      $thisWidget.addClass('activeClass');  

     /* use find() to target elements only in this instance*/
      $thisWidget.find('.someSubClass').css('color','blue');
     /* to affect previous or next main widget assuming they are next element in page*/
      $thisWidget.prev().doSOmthing();/* or next()`

     /* get the index of this widget compared to all the same widgets in page*/         
       var thisIndex= $('.myMainWidgetClass').index(this) 

}) 

Once you start using these concepts there many ways to target selectors based on traversals, indexing etc to write code that is more universal

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.