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I have a file with many lines, in each line there is either substring

whatever_blablablalsfjlsdjf;asdfjlds;f/watch?v=yPrg-JN50sw&amp,whatever_blabla

or

whatever_blablabla"/watch?v=yPrg-JN50sw&amp" class=whatever_blablablavwhate

I want to extract a substring, like the "yPrg-JN50s" above

the matching pattern is the 11 characters after the string "/watch?="

how to extract the substring

I hope it is sed, awk in one line if not, a pn line perl script is also ok

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ITYM /watch?v=, not /watch?=. Also, can that string occur multiple times on one line? –  Ed Morton Oct 30 '12 at 13:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can do

grep -oP '(?<=/watch\?v=).{11}'

if your grep knows Perl regex, or

sed 's/.*\/watch?v=\(.\{11\}\).*/\1/g'
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<div id="" yt-grid-box "><div class="yt-lockup-thumbnail"><a href="/watch?v=0_NfNAL3Ffc" class="ux-thumb-wrap yt-uix-sessionlink yt-uix-contextlink contains-addto result-item-thumb" data-sessionlink="ved=CAMQwBs%3D&amp;ei=CPTsy8bhqLMCFRR0fAodowXbww%3D%3D"><span class="video-thumb ux-thumb yt-thumb-default-185 "><span class="yt-thumb-clip"><span class="yt-thumb-clip-inner"><img src="//i1.ytimg.com/vi/0_NfNAL3Ffc/mqdefault.jpg" alt="Miniature" width="185" ><span class="vertical-align"></span></span></span></span><span class="video-time">5:15</span> –  user1769686 Oct 30 '12 at 13:08
    
like the above line, your script doesn't work in getting "0_NfNAL3Ffc", because (?=&amp) is not universal –  user1769686 Oct 30 '12 at 13:08
    
@user1769686 If it's not universal, just remove it. –  Lev Levitsky Oct 30 '12 at 13:09
3  
@user1769686: Why didn't you include this in your original question? Please edit your question to include this input. –  Steve Oct 30 '12 at 13:10
$ cat file
/watch?v=yPrg-JN50sw&amp
"/watch?v=yPrg-JN50sw&amp" class=
$
$ awk 'match($0,/\/watch\?v=/) { print substr($0,RSTART+RLENGTH,11) }' file
yPrg-JN50sw
yPrg-JN50sw
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Just with the shell's parameter expansion, extract the 11 chars after "watch?v=":

while IFS= read -r line; do
    tmp=${line##*watch?v=}
    echo ${tmp:0:11}
done < filename
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You could use sed to remove the extraneous information:

sed 's/[^=]\+=//; s/&.*$//' file

Or with awk and sensible field separators:

awk -F '[=&]' '{print $2}' file

Contents of file:

cat <<EOF > file
/watch?v=yPrg-JN50sw&amp
"/watch?v=yPrg-JN50sw&amp" class=
EOF

Output:

yPrg-JN50sw
yPrg-JN50sw

Edit accommodating new requirements mentioned in the comments

cat <<EOF > file
<div id="" yt-grid-box "><div class="yt-lockup-thumbnail"><a href="/watch?v=0_NfNAL3Ffc" class="ux-thumb-wrap yt-uix-sessionlink yt-uix-contextlink contains-addto result-item-thumb" data-sessionlink="ved=CAMQwBs%3D&amp;ei=CPTsy8bhqLMCFRR0fAodowXbww%3D%3D"><span class="video-thumb ux-thumb yt-thumb-default-185 "><span class="yt-thumb-clip"><span class="yt-thumb-clip-inner"><img src="//i1.ytimg.com/vi/0_NfNAL3Ffc/mqdefault.jpg" alt="Miniature" width="185" ><span class="vertical-align"></span></span></span></span><span class="video-time">5:15</span> 
EOF

Use awk with sensible record separator:

awk -v RS='[=&"]' '/watch/ { getline; print }' file

Note, you should use a proper XML parser for this sort of task.

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You should note that setting RS to more than one character makes it GNU awk specific. Other awks typically won't complain, they just won't work. –  Ed Morton Oct 30 '12 at 13:25
    
@EdMorton: well gawk and mawk, but yes this has portability issues. –  Thor Oct 30 '12 at 13:33
grep --perl-regexp --only-matching --regexp="(?<=/watch\\?=)([^&]{0,11})"
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Assuming your lines have exactly the format you quoted, this should work.

awk '{print substr($0,10,11)}'

Edit: From the comment in another answer, I guess your lines are much longer and complicated than this, in which case something more comprehensive is needed:

gawk '{if(match($0, "/watch\\?v=(\\w+)",a)) print a[1]}'
share|improve this answer
    
Most awks will not support \w. I suspect it's GNU awk specific. –  Ed Morton Oct 30 '12 at 13:26
    
GNU awk makes up the vast majority of awks out there, doesn't it? But I'll change the name to make it explicit. –  amaurea Oct 30 '12 at 13:27
1  
No. Most UNIX boxes don't come with GNU awk installed, they come with nawk, mawk, /usr/xpg4/bin/awk, or other. –  Ed Morton Oct 30 '12 at 13:30

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