Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is an elegant way of executing something similar to this without entering an infinite loop, if i must be an unsigned char?

for (unsigned char i = 0; i < 256; ++i) {
    printf("%d\n", i); 
}   
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted
unsigned char i = 0;
do {
    printf("%u\n",i);
}while(++i != 0);

Do the increment in the loop test and test against the wrapped value.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for overflow trick :) –  m0skit0 Oct 30 '12 at 13:07
    
Can the compiler unroll this? –  Phil H Oct 30 '12 at 14:09

As a general rule of thumb: if your iterator variable needs to hold all values between 0 and "Uxxx_MAX", you picked a too narrow type for the algorithm.

You should have considered using uint16_t instead.

There are just so many cases where you can't use a large int type instead of your unsigned char. So let me ask you, is your application a real time embedded system, written for an 8-bit MCU, where you have found that this very loop is a performance bottleneck?

  • If yes, then write an obscure loop with uint8_t as the type of the iterator, and comment why you did it.
  • If no, then use uint16_t or a larger integer type.
share|improve this answer

Put the check after the body and before the increment

for (unsigned char i = 0; ; ++i) {
    printf("%d\n", i); 
    if(i==255)
        break;
}   

But then you might as well do a while:

unsigned char i = 0;
while( ) {
    printf("%d\n", i); 
    if(i==255)
        break;
    ++i;
}   

Or even push the check around:

for (unsigned char i = 0; i++ < 255; ) {
    printf("%d\n", i); 
}   

All of these check for 255 before the increment, rather than checking for zero afterwards, so if the variable was a CHAR or some macro that was currently limited to 256 but could be changed, these would still work as they don't rely on overflow. Substitute int in there and it still works.

share|improve this answer
    
All of these examples are quite obscure, I wouldn't use nor recommend any of them. –  Lundin Oct 30 '12 at 14:06
    
@Lundin: Relying on overflow is also obscure, and does not explicitly show the number of iterations. I even wonder whether the compiler could unroll the loop, even though it is of static length? –  Phil H Oct 30 '12 at 14:08
    
Indeed, relying on overflow is obscure, even though it is well-defined. I suppose I'll write an answer on my own... :) –  Lundin Oct 30 '12 at 14:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.