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I have a spring controller with multiple spring bean dependencies (autowired services). Each service has also few spring bean dependencies (autowired daos). For instance, controller login method:

@Controller
@RequestMapping("/")
public class ClientAccessController extends BaseController {

    @Autowired
    IFileService fileService;

    @Autowired
    MidTierService midTierService;

    /**
     * Used to handle client login requests
     * Works as a proxy to MID tier server
     *
     * @param request LoginRequest(userLogin, userPassword, compId, installGuid)
     * @return LoginResponse (token)
     * @throws Exception
     */
    @RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST, value = "/login", headers = "Content-   type=application/json")
    public ResponseEntity<LoginResponse> login(@RequestBody LoginRequest request) throws Exception {

        log.info("LOGIN REQUEST [ " + request.toString() + " ]");

        String token = midTierService.authenticateNativeClient(request.getLogin(), request.getPassword(), request.getGuId(),
                request.getCompid().toString());
        LoginResponse response = new LoginResponse(token);

        HttpHeaders httpHeaders = new HttpHeaders();
        httpHeaders.setContentType(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON);

        ResponseEntity<LoginResponse> responseEntity = new ResponseEntity<>(response, HttpStatus.OK);

        log.info("LOGIN RESPONSE [ " + response.toString());

        return responseEntity;
    }

I am trying to write JUnit tests for only controller ClienAccessController. But when I autowire ClientAccessController in test class, spring tries to create beans for all controller dependencies and all nested ones (daos etc) but I really don't need em, only MidTierService. So what should I do to exclude nested beans initializations and to use only what I need in test classes?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Spring allows more than one way to @Autowired members. The perferred approach for me (from a testability standpoint) is to @Autowired the constructor. So I would create a constructor for ClientAccessController that looks like this:

@Autowired
public ClientAccessController(final IFileService fileService, final MidTierService midTierService) {
    this.fileService = fileService;
    this.midTierService = midTierService;
}

If your autowiring is a bit more complex (in that it uses @Qualifier or @Value) more can be done with parameter annotations.

@Autowired
public ClientAccessController(@Qualifier("myFileService") final IFileService fileService,
       @Qualifier("myMidTierService") final MidTierService midTierService) {
    this.fileService = fileService;
    this.midTierService = midTierService;
}

That way, you can easily set up this class with mock objects or stubs for testing.

@Test
public void testClientAccessController() {
    final IFileService mockFileService = Mockito.mock(IFileService.class);
    final MidTierService mockMidTierService = Mockito.mock(MidTierService.class);
    final ClientAccessController controller = new ClientAccessController(mockFileService, mockMidTierService);
    //test it
}
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but I have more than 2 dependencies in ClientAccessController and also have few nested dependencies in each service. For example FileService has 5 dependencies, dao classes, that create some connections to database, actually I do not need them –  BraginiNI Oct 30 '12 at 13:23
1  
If you have more dependencies, you can add them to the constructor. For each @Autowired member, there is no need to set them up properly if you mock them (as in the example). This is one of the primary reasons why Spring was created, to make testing easier due to Inversion of Control. –  nicholas.hauschild Oct 30 '12 at 13:24
    
ok, lets assume that FileService has FileDao dependency and FileDao uses some ConnectionPool dependency, how it is gonna look like? seems very ugly as I have to mock too many things –  BraginiNI Oct 30 '12 at 14:23
    
Well, since fileService is not even used in your login method, you can pass in null for testing it. You should really only need to mock midTierService.authenticateNativeClient(...) to return some bogus String that you can compare with in the output. –  nicholas.hauschild Oct 30 '12 at 15:25
    
org.springframework.beans.factory.UnsatisfiedDependencyException: Error creating bean with name 'clientAccessController' Unsatisfied dependency expressed through constructor argument with index 0 of type [com.grupoxango.lockbox.business.service.impl.MidTierService –  BraginiNI Oct 30 '12 at 16:27

Instead of creating a constructor with the all the dependencies as parameters, I create a set method for each dependency. This way, I can mock those dependencies in the tests and inject them with the setters. So the test would end up like this:

@Test
public void testClientAccessController() {
    final IFileService mockFileService = Mockito.mock(IFileService.class);
    final MidTierService mockMidTierService = Mockito.mock(MidTierService.class);
    final ClientAccessController controller = new ClientAccessController();

    controller.setFileService(mockFileService);
    controller.setMidTierService(mockMidTierService);
    //test it
}

I also recommend you create those setters as protected and have the test cases in the same package as the class you are testing.

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