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I'm trying to implement lazy method execution in ruby. Let's say I have a class with two methods which should not be executed immediately after call

class Foo
  lazy_evaluate :bar, :baz

  def bar(string)
    puts string
  end

  def baz(hash)
    puts hash.inspect
  end
end

f = Foo.new
f.bar('hello world') => nil
f.baz(hello: :world) => nil

f.run_lazy_methods =>
'hello world'
'{:hello=>:world}'

I wan't use this in my gem http://pastie.org/5137463

I'm asking for idea how to implement this behaviour

share|improve this question
1  
Look at Delayed Job, Sidekiq, or any of the other asynchronous queuing gems. –  meagar Oct 30 '12 at 13:24
    
Imo in this specific case I can't use Delayed job and other background workers. pastie.org/5137463 –  Lewy Oct 30 '12 at 13:30
    
You may want to take a look at this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/9371875/task-future-in-ruby –  Paul Rubel Oct 30 '12 at 13:47
1  
I'm telling you to look at them for inspiration, not to actually use them. –  meagar Oct 30 '12 at 14:19

2 Answers 2

Use a delegate object, record the methods invoked onto a stack, then replay them on the delegate.

class LazyObject
  def initialize(delegate)
    @invocations = []
    @delegate    = delegate
  end

  def bar(*args, &block)
    @invocations << {
      method: :bar,
      args:   args,
      block:  block
    }
  end

  def baz(*args, &block)
    @invocations << {
      method: :baz,
      args:   args,
      block:  block
    }
  end

  def run_lazy_methods
    @invocations.each do |inv|
      @delegate.send(
        inv[:method],
        *inv[:args],
        &inv[:block]
      )
    end
  end
end

obj = LazyObject.new(RealObject.new)
obj.bar(hello: :world)
obj.baz("Hello World")
obj.run_lazy_methods

You could write the above better using method_missing, but I wanted to make it clear ;)

share|improve this answer

I found it difficult to make it possible to allow lazy_evaluate before the corresponding method definitions. My implementation works when you put it after the corresponding definitions.

The preparation part is:

class Foo
  def initialize
    @queue = []
  end
  def run_lazy_methods
    @queue.each{|proc| proc.call}
  end
  def self.lazy_evaluate *methods
    methods.each do |method|
      alias :"old_#{method}" :"#{method}"
      define_method method do |*args, &pr|
        @queue.push(->{send(:"old_#{method}", *args, &pr)})
      end
    end
  end
end

Then, when you define the methods, and call lazy_evaluate, they become lazy.

class Foo
  def bar(string)
    puts string
  end
  def baz(hash)
    puts hash.inspect
  end

  lazy_evaluate :bar, :baz
end

And you will get the expected results.

f = Foo.new
f.bar('hello world')
f.baz(hello: :world)
f.run_lazy_methods
share|improve this answer
    
Put the lazy_methods definition in a module. Use method_added to capture the method definitions as they are inserted. –  d11wtq Oct 30 '12 at 23:19
    
@d11wtq Is that for moving the lazy_evaluation to the front of foo, and baz definitions? –  sawa Oct 30 '12 at 23:27
1  
sawa that's right, yes. If you have a list of method names that you want to wrap, you can detect when they get defined because as each one is defined, method_added is invoked, so you can wrap them at the point. –  d11wtq Oct 31 '12 at 1:49

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