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Code :

var coordinateTratte = {
        "1522-nord": [
             {"Distanza": 0, "Lat": 45.02915, "Lng": 7.606131667},            
             {"Distanza": 0.1, "Lat": 45.02805167, "Lng": 7.605818333}
        ]
    };

for (var key in coordinateTratte) {
    var obj = coordinateTratte[key];
    for (var prop in obj) {  
        console.log(obj[prop].Lat);
    }
}
​

Why 20 undefined?

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closed as too localized by Ken White, 0x499602D2, I Hate Lazy, nDudani, Lucas Oct 31 '12 at 6:48

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i test it, it work perfect –  Welling Oct 30 '12 at 14:34
    
yes, works: jsfiddle.net/8ejhR/1 –  lrsjng Oct 30 '12 at 14:36
    
You have MooTools loaded and as others show, you are not properly iterating the Array. When you use jsFiddle, it's best to first set the proper settings on the left, like choosing No-Library (pure JS) from the menu. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 30 '12 at 14:39
    
Is it so a stupid question? -3? Lol... –  markzzz Oct 30 '12 at 14:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"1522-nord" is an array through which you were traversing with a for-in. Do not use a for-in on arrays. Use a regular loop:

for (var key in coordinateTratte) {
    var obj = coordinateTratte[key];
    for (var i = 0; i < obj.length; i++) { // <--
        console.log(obj[i].Lat);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
var coordinateTratte = {"1522-nord":[{"Distanza":0,"Lat":45.02915,"Lng":7.606131667},{"Distanza":0.1,"Lat":45.02805167,"Lng":7.605818333}]};

for (var key in coordinateTratte) {
    var obj = coordinateTratte[key];
    for (var i = 0; i < obj.length; i++) {  
        console.log(obj[i].Lat);
    }
}

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/bdgnJ/

share|improve this answer
    
Well, now 22 undefined :) –  markzzz Oct 30 '12 at 14:29
    
@markzzz Edited –  karaxuna Oct 30 '12 at 14:34

@user1689607's comment seems to me to be the answer. When you select no lib (pure JS), your code doesn't log any undefined values. The thing is: libs often fiddle with the prototypes of native types. The most notorious lib to do so is prototype.js (the clue is in the name). The "magic property" of a regular, unaltered Array object, for example is not enumerable (ie: doesn't show up in a for...in loop of an array). When you start adding your own properties and methods, however, chances are that they will show up. Since the Array is derived from the Object prototype, any alterations to that prototype might show up, too.

The long and short of it is: never, ever use for...in on an array. If you do use for...in (on an object), always check if whatever property you're processing is set directly on that object, and isn't coming from the prototype:

for (var prop in someObject)
{
    if (someObject.hasOwnProperty(prop))
    {
        //do stuff
    }
}

As far as arrays is concerned: for(var i=0;i<theArray.length;i++) should help you steer clear of most issues (keep in mind that arrays are sparse in JS):

var normalArray = [1,2];
var sparseArray = [1,2,3,4];
delete sparseArray[2];//will log [1,2,undefined,4]
for (var i=0;i<sparseArray.length;i++)
{
    if (i < normalArray.length)
    {
        console.log(normalArray[i]);
    }
    console.log(sparseArray[i]);//will log 1 - 2 - undefined - 4
    if (sparseArray.hasOwnProperty(i))
    {
        console.log(sparseArray[i]);//logs 1 - 2 - 4
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Try:

for (var key in coordinateTratte) {
    var obj = coordinateTratte[key];
    for (var prop in obj) {  
        if(obj.hasOwnProperty(prop))
            console.log(obj[prop].Lat);
    }
}

You iterate over all Array properties. Even if they come from its prototype.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 :-] Also, you could use chris.photobooks.com/json/default.htm in order to get a clear look of your structure and see when you should loop trough object and when array. –  gotqn Oct 30 '12 at 14:31
1  
-1 Don't use for in on arrays, even if it works. –  0x499602D2 Oct 30 '12 at 14:34
    
Btw. for arrays it's better to use simple for loop or forEach method (if your code doesn't have to run on old IE - check browser compatibility). –  dreame4 Oct 30 '12 at 14:34
    
@David : "Don't use for in on arrays, even if it works." Why? Just curious... –  markzzz Oct 30 '12 at 21:17
    
@markzzz It's verbose, unreadable, and you need to use the .hasOwnProperty method. Also, if beginners see this, they might imitate it incorrectly in their own programs. –  0x499602D2 Oct 30 '12 at 21:23

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