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I'm looking for a way to quickly and routinely add my signature and the date to the top of new code files in Visual Studio.

There are some tutorials on using Macros to do this, but apparently Macros are no longer supported in VS2012.

I can define the header as a code snippet and insert the snippet, but snippets don't support getting the current date.

I can generate the correct text with the following T4 template:

<#@ template debug="false" hostspecific="false" language="C#" #>

// <author>Pieter Müller</author>
// <date><#=DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd")#></date>

<#@ output extension=".cs" #>

This gives me the following result, which is perfect:

// <author>Pieter Müller</author>
// <date>2012-10-30</date>

The question is, is there a way for me to quickly and routinely insert this code into new code files, either automatically or manually using something similiar to Insert Snippet or a shortcut key?

If you don't have an answer, but you do have a good idea on generating the signature headers I need, please leave a comment. Thanks!

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Instead of doing this with code snippets/T4 I would look at an MSBuild task/targets that gets invoked before build and automatically updates files accordingly. Should not be hard to do, will not require manual work. –  Pawel Oct 30 '12 at 18:00
    
I don't know if this will help, but it looks like it might have some potential. It's the Preprocessed Text Template i'm thinking of here: stackoverflow.com/questions/9149263/t4-output-to-string –  U1199880 Oct 30 '12 at 18:17
    
Thanks @Pawel. It certainly would be possible with build tasks, with the drawback being that you would have to be careful if you don't want to apply the header to ALL files. Maybe a solution would be to insert a tag at the top of each code file for which the header should be injected, and then setup MSBuild to run a script pre-build that injects the headers wherever it finds the tag. –  Pieter Müller Nov 9 '12 at 7:41
    
Thanks @U1199880. The issue with Preprocessed templates are that you still don't have a way of inserting the text at the exact location you want it (as with snippets). However, your link helped me to come up with the solution. –  Pieter Müller Nov 9 '12 at 7:42

2 Answers 2

Hope you are using ReSharper, which has powerful templates. I've implemented your example using very simple configuration for template variables enter image description here

Now if I enter 'hd' and press tab this macro I will receive next result: enter image description here enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Ilya, that looks great, but unfortunately I do not have ReSharper. –  Pieter Müller Nov 9 '12 at 6:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I hate to be answering my own question, but I did come up with a way to have T4 templates as snippets, although its Hack Level is over 9000. It works by writing a T4 template that generates a snippet, which it then automatically copies to the Visual Studio snippet folder.

  • Add a Text Template item to your project.

  • Set it up to build a snippet, that in turn builds the code you want to insert. For the example in my question, the snippet XML that you want to generate with the T4 template looks like this:

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
    <CodeSnippets xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/2005/CodeSnippet">
      <CodeSnippet Format="1.0.0">
        <Header>
          <SnippetTypes>
            <SnippetType>Expansion</SnippetType>
          </SnippetTypes>
          <Title>DateHeaderSnippet</Title>
          <Author>user</Author>
        </Header>
        <Snippet>
          <Code Language="csharp">
            <![CDATA[//    <author>Pieter Muller</author>
    //    <date>{Today's Date}</date>]]>
          </Code>
        </Snippet>
      </CodeSnippet>
    </CodeSnippets>
    
    • To generate the above XML with a T4 template, we can insert the XML almost verbatim, with two changes. Firstly, this line:

      <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
      

      must be inside a manual WriteLine statement, or the <?xml tag will confuse the T4 template processor:

      <# WriteLine("<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"utf-8\"?>"); #>
      
    • And secondly, we want to use the T4 processing to inject today's date into the snippet XML, so we change:

              <![CDATA[//    <author>Pieter Muller</author>
      //    <date>{Today's Date}</date>]]>
      

      to:

              <![CDATA[//    <author>Pieter Muller2</author>
      //    <date><#=DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd")#></date>]]>
      
  • We also add some very hacky code to the end of the T4 template, that mannually reads the output file and writes it to a snippet file. The hacky part of this is that we have to specify absolute paths. The complete T4 code looks like this:

    <#@ template debug="false" hostspecific="false" language="C#" #>
    <#@ output extension=".txt" #>
    <# WriteLine("<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"utf-8\"?>"); #>
    <CodeSnippets xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/2005/CodeSnippet">
      <CodeSnippet Format="1.0.0">
        <Header>
          <SnippetTypes>
            <SnippetType>Expansion</SnippetType>
          </SnippetTypes>
          <Title>DateHeaderSnippet</Title>
          <Author>user</Author>
        </Header>
        <Snippet>
          <Code Language="csharp">
            <![CDATA[//    <author>Pieter Muller2</author>
    //    <date><#=DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd")#></date>]]>
          </Code>
        </Snippet>
      </CodeSnippet>
    </CodeSnippets>
    <#    
        System.IO.StreamReader sr = new System.IO.StreamReader(@"C:\Users\Pieter\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\Projects\tmp\tmp\TextTemplateToWriteHeaderTemplate.txt");
        string sourceText = sr.ReadToEnd();
        sr.Close();
    
        System.IO.StreamWriter sw = new System.IO.StreamWriter(@"C:\Users\Pieter\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\Code Snippets\Visual C#\My Code Snippets\tryout.snippet");    
        sw.WriteLine(sourceText);    
        sw.Close();    
    #>
    
  • You'll have to compile the T4 template twice - the first run generates the snippet code, and the second run writes the previous run's output to the snippet folder. To do this, right click on the template in the Solution Explorer and click Run Custom Tool.

  • Now you can right click anywhere in code, select Insert Snippet... and select the generated snippet from the My Code Snippets group. The result:

    //    <author>Pieter Muller2</author>
    //    <date>2012-11-09</date>
    

I know this is way too much trouble to go through just to insert a simple author and date header, but hopefully someone else can use this technique for something more grandiose. You can put pretty much generate any kind of dynamic snippet this way.

share|improve this answer
    
I think T4 has never been used for such solutions, anyway +1 –  Ilya Ivanov Nov 9 '12 at 11:18
    
T4 templates that generate snippets.. now THAT is creative. Only problem is you have to re-run the template every day to keep your snippet up-to-date. Have you found a way around this? –  Dan Sep 19 '14 at 18:51

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