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I'm trying to cast List<object> to List<string> dynamically. I've tried several ways, but I can't find a solution. This is a small sample that shows the problem:

List<object> listObject = new List<object>();
listObject.Add("ITEM 1");
listObject.Add("ITEM 2");
listObject.Add("ITEM 3");

List<string> listString = ¿¿listObject??;

Thanks in advance!

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8  
This won't be possible in version 4 either, because it is not typesafe to either "upcast" or "downcast" a List<T> - it's invariant, not covariant or contravariant. By the way, I'm getting tired of this misinformation being posted to every question about collection co/contravariance. –  Pavel Minaev Aug 21 '09 at 21:01

5 Answers 5

If you can use LINQ then the Cast method will do what you need:

List<string> listString = listObject.Cast<string>().ToList();

You can also use the ConvertAll method, as Stan points out in his answer:

List<string> listString = listObject.ConvertAll(x => (string)x);

If you're not using C#3 then you'll need to use the "old" delegate syntax rather than a lambda:

List<string> listString =
    listObject.ConvertAll(delegate(object x) { return (string)x; });
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+1 for correct use of delegate sytnax :) –  Nader Shirazie Aug 21 '09 at 20:56
1  
@nader: I always try to remember that when LINQ isn't available then neither is lambda syntax. –  LukeH Aug 21 '09 at 21:00
    
+1 good point Luke –  Stan R. Aug 21 '09 at 21:12
    
And just to pre-empt any nitpickers... I'm aware that VS2008 can target earlier versions of the .NET framework, which would allow the use of lambda syntax but not LINQ. But, as a rule-of-thumb, no LINQ usually means no lambdas too. –  LukeH Aug 22 '09 at 22:54

If you're using .NET 3.5 you can use, this way you don't have to do an extra ToList(). You can also supply your own converter if you need to convert advanced objects.

 List<string> listString = listObject.ConvertAll(x=> x as String);

If you can't use LINQ you can do this

foreach(object item in listObject)
{
  string convertedItem = item as String;
  if(convertedItem != null)
       listString.Add(convertedItem);
}
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1  
This is also supported in .NET 2.0 (without LINQ, though the delgate syntax is not as nice). One note though, I don't believe the .Cast<string>.ToList() will create an "extra" list as you're implying. It will create one new list, for the result, as does your approach –  Nader Shirazie Aug 21 '09 at 20:57
    
I think you mean C# 3.0 and .Net 3.5. –  user7116 Aug 21 '09 at 20:59
    
that is what i meant. thanks. –  Stan R. Aug 21 '09 at 21:04
    
@nader: I was implying that ToList() does an extra enumeration. –  Stan R. Aug 21 '09 at 21:10
1  
@Stan: Are you sure? ToList() will cause an enumeration, but that's it. Cast<string>() will not actually enumerate the collection. –  Nader Shirazie Aug 21 '09 at 21:35

How bout this:

public static List<T> ConvertToGenericList<T>(IList listOfObjects)
{
    List<T> items = new List<T>();

    for (int i = 0; i < listOfObjects.Count; i++)
    {
        items.Add((T)listOfObjects[i]);
    }
     return items;
}

Usage:

List<object> listObject = new List<object>();
listObject.Add("ITEM 1");
listObject.Add("ITEM 2");
listObject.Add("ITEM 3");
List<string> listString = Converter.ConvertToGenericList<string>(listObject);
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I don't think you can do it one step. Instead, try something like this:

		List<object> listObject = new List<object>();
		listObject.Add( "ITEM 1" );
		listObject.Add( "ITEM 2" );
		listObject.Add( "ITEM 3" );

		List<string> lstStr = new List<string>( listObject.Count );

		foreach ( object obj in listObject )
		{
			lstStr.Add( obj.ToString() );
		}
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this is wrong, he doesn't want toc all ToString() on thos object, he wants to convert it to a string object. Technically your example will work this time, but only for strings. But if he happens to bump into a more advanced object, he wont be able to use this method. –  Stan R. Aug 21 '09 at 20:51
    
It can be done in one step, see the other answers... –  Nader Shirazie Aug 21 '09 at 20:54
List<string> listString = (from o in listObject select (string)o).ToList();
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1  
See Enumerable.Cast<T>(). –  Pavel Minaev Aug 21 '09 at 21:02

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