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I woud like to ask, what bin-'0' means in this piece of code which convert binary number to decimal. Thanks.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(){
    char bin;
    int dec = 0;

    printf("Binary: \n");
    bin = getchar();

    while((bin != '\n')){
        if((bin != '0') && (bin != '1')){
            printf("Wrong!\n");
            return 0;
        }
        printf("%c",bin-'0');  // ?

        dec = dec*2+(bin-'0'); // ?
        bin = getchar();
    }

    printf("Decimal: %d\n", dec);

    return 0;
}
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The statement printf("%c",bin-'0'); does nothing useful. Try "%d\n" there, instead. –  Robᵩ Oct 30 '12 at 14:53
    
Another case of misleading identifier names. –  Thomas Matthews Oct 30 '12 at 16:13

2 Answers 2

bin - '0' converts the ASCII value of bin to its integer value. Given bin = '1', bin - '0' = 1

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Is this guaranteed ('1' being 49)? –  Luchian Grigore Oct 30 '12 at 14:50
2  
@LuchianGrigore I'm pretty sure that ascii table is standardized. But I dont want to affirm that. –  tomahh Oct 30 '12 at 14:51
    
@LuchianGrigore According to wikipedia, yes, It is sure. –  tomahh Oct 30 '12 at 14:53
3  
ASCII stands for American Standard Code for Information Interchange, so I guess it's standardized :) –  Andreas Brinck Oct 30 '12 at 14:53
1  
Does the standard say C++ has to use ASCII? –  Luchian Grigore Oct 30 '12 at 14:55

This code is taking advantage of the fact that C++ chars are really just special ints. It's using getchar to take in a char that is either '0' or '1'. Now it needs to convert that into 0 or 1 (note that these are numbers, not chars). Given that the char '0' is one before '1', subtracting the value of char '0' from both will turn '0' into 0 and '1' into 1.

'0' - '0' = 0
'1' - '0' = 1
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