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I have this chunk of XML:

<show name="Are We There Yet?">
  <sid>24588</sid>
  <network>TBS</network>
  <title>The Kwandanegaba Children's Fund Episode</title>
  <ep>03x31</ep>
  <link>
    http://www.tvrage.com/shows/id-24588/episodes/1065228407
  </link>
</show>

I am trying to get "Are we there yet?" via Nokogiri. It is effectively the 'name' attribute of 'show'. I'm struggling to figure out how to parse this.

xml.at_css('show').value was my best guess but doesn't work.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use the following:

xml.at('//show/@name').text

which is XPath expression that returns the name attribute from the show element.

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1  
This is close, but it doesn't quite work: xml.at('//show/@name') returns a Nokogiri::XML::Attr, not text. xml.at('//show/@name').value returns => "Are We There Yet?" –  the Tin Man Oct 30 '12 at 23:39
1  
You're right. I tested with puts, which does a to_s on it. Updated. –  Mark Thomas Oct 31 '12 at 0:03

Use:

require 'nokogiri'

xml =<<EOT
<show name="Are We There Yet?">
  <sid>24588</sid>
  <network>TBS</network>
  <title>The Kwandanegaba Children's Fund Episode</title>
  <ep>03x31</ep>
  <link>
    http://www.tvrage.com/shows/id-24588/episodes/1065228407
  </link>
</show>
EOT

xml = Nokogiri::XML(xml)
puts xml.at('show')['name']
=> Are We There Yet?

at accepts either CSS or XPath expressions, so feel free to use it for both. Use at_css or at_xpath if you know you need to declare the expression as CSS or XPath, respectively. at returns a Node, so you can simply reference the parameters of the node like you would a hash.

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1  
Super minor aside: I personally prefer and recommend Nokogiri.XML(…) over Nokogiri::XML(…) as it helps clarify that this is a method call and not some weird usage of the Nokogiri::XML module. Plus, it's one fewer character and two fewer key presses (on my keyboard). –  Phrogz Oct 31 '12 at 4:51
    
I use Nokogiri::XML or Nokogiri::HTML out of habit. It's how I learned it from their tutorials several years ago. I agree that using the . notation is more indicative that it's a method, not a constant. –  the Tin Man Oct 31 '12 at 14:46
    
@Phrogz I'm in the same boat as the Tin Man, but since your comment above (which I also agree with), I have switched to that style. –  Mark Thomas Nov 3 '12 at 16:53

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