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I've been struggling for hours trying to figure out why I kept getting extremely strange results in my application. Things just kept "turning on" when they certainly weren't supposed to. I narrowed it down to a code segment very similar to the following:

test=[[False]*28]*24

print(test[5][7])
print(test[6][7])
test[5][7]=True
print(test[5][7])
print(test[6][7])

I only want to change the value of the 7th indice of the 5th indice in this particular case, however, various other indices are changes as well. Running this will get me:

False

False

True

True

While I would expect to get:

False

False

True

False

Does anybody understand why this is happening? Am I overlooking something? Does it have to do with how I'm initializing my list? I really just want a 24*28 list filled with bools = False.

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closed as not a real question by Lucas, JE SUIS CHARLIE, Eitan T, raina77ow, Tamás Oct 31 '12 at 10:09

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
possible duplicate of Python list confusion –  raina77ow Oct 31 '12 at 9:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The line test=[[False]*28]*24 creates 24 references to the same list of 28 False values. You probably want something like:

test = [ [False]*28 for _ in range(24) ]

This forces the creation of 24 independent lists of False.


As a side note -- you should consider numpy.

import numpy as np
test = np.zeros((24,28),dtype=bool)
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Because it is all the same lists.

to illustrate my point I use the built-in function id:

id(test[x])

this returns the same value for all legal values of x

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1  
Wll all"False"s in Python will be the same "False" always,.What you shoult mean is that they are all the same lists holding a single boolean element –  jsbueno Oct 30 '12 at 15:31
    
@jsbueno: thanks –  Sheena Oct 30 '12 at 15:32

The problem is then when you issu an statement such as a = list[[0]] ] you don't get a list with ten other smaller lists each containing a "0" inside. You get a list, with ten instances of the same [0]list inside, and changing "one" will change "all" -- actually, in thsi case all are the same.

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