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I want to make my 'esc'-key to do something different based on current situation.. For example I have a button that shows a toolbar and I want the 'esc'-key to hide it, but I also want the 'esc'-key to open a box for closing the current page, and again if you press the 'esc'-key it should hide the closing box.

I thought it would be something like this, but it only opens the closing box. It doesn't close it when I type 'esc' again, neither does it hide the toolbox when it is shown. It just opens the closing box on top.

function esc_key_command() {
    if (toolboxIsShown) {
        $('.tool_box').hide();
        var toolboxIsShown = false;
    } else if (CloserIsShown) {
        $('.closer').stop().fadeOut(200);
        var CloserIsShown = false;
    } else {
        $('.closer').stop().fadeIn(200);
        var CloserIsShown = true;
    }
}

I know it has nothing to do with calling the 'esc' key because it at least returns something when the key is typed.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The var declarations is the problem. The scope of the variables are local, so every time you call the function, they are reset.

If you want to do it with variables, you need to make them set outside of the function scope.

Why use variables when you can check the state

function esc_key_command() {
    var tools = $('.tool_box');
    var closer = $('.closer');
    if (tools.is(":visible")) {
        $('.tool_box').hide();
    } else if (closer.is(":visible")) {
        $('.closer').stop().fadeOut(200);
    } else {
        $('.closer').stop().fadeIn(200);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
okay. :) then how should I do it instead? –  Dimser Oct 30 '12 at 15:49
    
Perfect. :D This is the right thing.. okay.. I don't understand why it is a problem with the var elements? Do you know a logic jQuery explanation? It may keep me from asking a similar question another time :) –  Dimser Oct 30 '12 at 15:56
    
Because they are local variables. Local variables maintain their values only in the lifespan of that function call. So when that function is done executing those variables are removed. There is no reference to them. –  epascarello Oct 30 '12 at 16:11
    
Using a closure would make this answer slightly better. –  aziz punjani Oct 30 '12 at 16:31

It looks like a scope issue. The variable CloserIsShown is being created inside the esc_key_command function, so it's not there yet when you run the comparison. Try setting the variable outside the function and removing the var commands when you reassign the value inside the function.

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var CloserIsShown = false; var toolboxIsShown = false; function esc_key_command() { if (toolboxIsShown) { $('.tool_box').hide(); toolboxIsShown = false; } else if (CloserIsShown) { $('.closer').stop().fadeOut(200); CloserIsShown = false; } else { $('.closer').stop().fadeIn(200); CloserIsShown = true; } } –  thingEvery Oct 30 '12 at 15:52

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