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I was experimenting with writing a program that would reverse the contents of a file. So, giving the inputfile with the content "abc" it should make a file with a content "cba".

Unfortunately, it doesn't work and I don't understand why.

Could you guys please help me? Thanks

EDIT: i forgot to mention that it was a school assignment - and we have to use functions like lseek and open - Please dont posr me that I should've used fgetc anfd other functions :)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>

void reverse_file(char * in, char * out)
{
    int infile, outfile;
    infile = open(in, O_RDONLY);
    outfile = open(out, O_WRONLY);

    char buffer;
    char end = EOF;
    write(outfile, &end, sizeof(char));
    do
    {
        // seek to the beginning of a file

        read(infile, &buffer, sizeof(char));


        // printf("the code of a character %d\n", buffer); // returns 10 instead of EOF

        lseek(outfile, 0, SEEK_SET);
        write(outfile, &buffer, sizeof(char));

    } while (buffer != EOF);
    close(outfile);
    close(infile);


}

int main()
{
    reverse_file("tt", "testoutput");

    return 0;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your current code (outside the fact that the test for the end of file is wrong), will make a file of one char, because write overwrite the data present in the file at the current position (unless it's at the end, where it would append). Actually, to reverse the file, you should read it starting from the end.

struct stat instat;
int pos;

fstat(infile, &instat);
pos = instat.st_size - 1;
do
{
    // seek backward in the input file, starting from the end
    lseek(infile, SEEK_SET, pos);
    read(infile, &buffer, sizeof(char));
    write(outfile, &buffer, sizeof(char));

} while (pos-- > 0);

(Reading char by char is very ineficient with the unix read and write system calls, so as a second step, you should consider using the C primitives (fopen, fread, fwrite), or do some buffered reads and writes with the unix system calls.)

See:

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read returns the number of bytes it reads. To make your loop stop when you reach the end of the file, change your condition to the return value of read.

int read_ret;
do
{
    // seek to the beginning of a file

    read_ret = read(infile, &buffer, sizeof(char));


    // printf("the code of a character %d\n", buffer); // returns 10 instead of EOF

    lseek(outfile, 0, SEEK_SET);
    write(outfile, &buffer, sizeof(char));

} while (read_ret > 0);

When read reach the end of the file and returns zero, it does not set *buffer. That is why your loop never stop.

share|improve this answer
    
ok, thanks. One last question - why did it return number 10 ? What does this value mean? –  Novellizator Oct 30 '12 at 16:22
    
10 is the ASCII code for the newline (\n) character, which obviously is the last character of your file. It did not "returned" this value, but it was left unchanged since the previous loop iteration. –  tomahh Oct 30 '12 at 16:25

You need to read to read the whole input file and then write it out. Don't try to do it char by char and don't use lseek.

share|improve this answer
    
And you need to keep the entire file in memory.... maybe using mmap –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 30 '12 at 18:31

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