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How can I change the way a dictionary works, so that if there is no KVP with given key, it returns a default value, without wrapping usual dic["nonexistentKey"] with try-catch?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could make your own class which encapsulates a Dictionary<TKey,TValue>, and implements IDictionary<TKey,TValue>.

This will behave like a dictionary, but you can write the behavior to handle your non-existent key any way you wish.

However, you can't change the way the actual Dictionary<TKey,TValue> class functions.

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Use Dictionary.TryGetValue :

Dictionary<int, YourType> dictionary = ...;
YourType x;
if (!dictionary.TryGetValue(123, out x))
{
    x = new YourType();
}

// here X will be assigned to the value or the default if the key was not present.

If you really need to override the default dictionary[key] approach, you can use this class (as either the dictionary itself or as a wrapper for an existing dictionary):

/// <summary>
/// A dictionary implementation that returns the default value of <typeparamref name="TValue"/> when the key is not present in the dictionary.
/// </summary>
public class DictionaryWithDefaults<TKey, TValue> : IDictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Holds the actual data using standard dictionary.
    /// </summary>
    private IDictionary<TKey, TValue> _storage;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="DictionaryWithDefaults{TValue}" /> class.
    /// The data is stored directly in this dictionary.
    /// </summary>
    public DictionaryWithDefaults()
    {
        this._storage = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="DictionaryWithDefaults{TValue}" /> class.
    /// This dictionary acts as a wrapper for the data stored in the dictionary <paramref name="forWrapping" />.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="forWrapping">The dictionary object for wrapping.</param>
    /// <exception cref="System.ArgumentNullException">when <paramref name="forWrapping"/> is <c>null</c></exception>
    public DictionaryWithDefaults(IDictionary<TKey, TValue> forWrapping)
    {
        if (forWrapping == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("forWrapping");

        this._storage = forWrapping;
    }

    public void Add(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        this._storage.Add(key, value);
    }

    public bool ContainsKey(TKey key)
    {
        return this._storage.ContainsKey(key);
    }

    public ICollection<TKey> Keys
    {
        get { return this._storage.Keys; }
    }

    public bool Remove(TKey key)
    {
        return this._storage.Remove(key);
    }

    public bool TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value)
    {
        // always return a value, even if the key does not exist.
        // this is also the only place one would modify if the default value has to be customized (passed in the constructor etc.)
        if (!this._storage.TryGetValue(key, out value))
            value = default(TValue);

        return true;
    }

    public ICollection<TValue> Values
    {
        get { return this._storage.Values; }
    }

    public TValue this[TKey key]
    {
        get
        {
            TValue value;
            this.TryGetValue(key, out value);
            return value;
        }
        set
        {
            this._storage[key] = value;
        }
    }

    public void Add(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item)
    {
        this._storage.Add(item);
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        this._storage.Clear();
    }

    public bool Contains(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item)
    {
        return this._storage.Contains(item);
    }

    public void CopyTo(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        this._storage.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return this._storage.Count; }
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return this._storage.IsReadOnly; }
    }

    public bool Remove(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item)
    {
        return this._storage.Remove(item);
    }

    public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this._storage.GetEnumerator();
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this._storage.GetEnumerator();
    }
}
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1  
-1. This is not a very good solution because the code to check if a default is needed must be everywhere where the dictionary is used. If the default value changes later on, all these places would have to be updated and then the entire program would have to be tested. Wrapping a Dictionary<U, V> and implementing IDictionary<U, V> is the right solution. –  xxbbcc Oct 30 '12 at 16:29
    
In my opinion, using a wrapper just to avoid the exception is not the correct approach mostly because it is usually not the default value one is after but rather to switch the behavior. But in any case I added the implementation of a dictionary wrapper to the answer. –  Knaģis Oct 30 '12 at 16:44
    
I removed my -1 after your change. I think your first idea is very problematic because that code would end up all over the place. When using a dictionary with a default value, every time you need to get an item from the dictionary, you'd have to perform that check - there's just no way to avoid that. –  xxbbcc Oct 30 '12 at 16:53

You can also add an extension method to IDictionary, or Dictionary if you prefer.

public static class IDictionaryExtensions
{
    public static TValue ValueAtOrDefault<TKey, TValue>(
        this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, TKey key, TValue defaultValue)
    {
        if (dictionary == null || !dictionary.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            return defaultValue;
        }

        return dictionary[key];
    }
}

Note that you may want to throw an ArgumentNullException if the dictionary is null, rather than returning the default value as in the example... whatever is appropriate for you.

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You could improve the perf slightly by using TryGetValue instead: TValue val; return ((dictionary != null) && dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out val)) ? val : defaultValue; –  LukeH Oct 30 '12 at 17:58
1  
You're right. Both ContainsKey and the item indexer call FindEntry. TryGetValue combines both of those calls into one - at least for the concrete generic Dictionary implementation of IDictionary<TKey, TValue>. I thought about updating the answer, but personally, I'd go with the easier to read approach - there's just something about a ternary with TryGetValue/TryParse methods that I don't like reading... maybe it's the uninitialized variable preceding it. –  seth flowers Oct 30 '12 at 18:15

No, you have to wrap it. this[] is not a virtual method and cannot be overridden.

So your best bet is to create a simple class that exposes IDictionary (or only selected methods) and that wraps the this[] get with a try/catch.

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