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In Fabric.js you see a lot of places where a code block enclosed in a condition check of format:

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {} or

if (!Array.prototype.forEach) {} etc.

Isn't the result always false? Why checking the boolean value of a method?

Thanks.

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Do you understand truthy values in JavaScript. –  epascarello Oct 30 '12 at 17:17
    
@epascarello I guess I don't really since you asked. I do know !!undefined == false, however didn't make the connection in this case. –  user898871 Oct 30 '12 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Those tests pass when the functions aren't defined.

Old browsers don't have those functions. That's why they're testing for their presence.

The MDN gives the same example (classical) of this test used to define a replacement function for array.indexOf (for IE before version 9) :

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
    Array.prototype.indexOf = function (searchElement /*, fromIndex */ ) {
        "use strict";
        if (this == null) {
            throw new TypeError();
        }
        var t = Object(this);
        var len = t.length >>> 0;
        if (len === 0) {
            return -1;
        }
        var n = 0;
        if (arguments.length > 1) {
            n = Number(arguments[1]);
            if (n != n) { // shortcut for verifying if it's NaN
                n = 0;
            } else if (n != 0 && n != Infinity && n != -Infinity) {
                n = (n > 0 || -1) * Math.floor(Math.abs(n));
            }
        }
        if (n >= len) {
            return -1;
        }
        var k = n >= 0 ? n : Math.max(len - Math.abs(n), 0);
        for (; k < len; k++) {
            if (k in t && t[k] === searchElement) {
                return k;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }
}
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It is checking for the existence of the method. If it doesn't exist, it will be undefined, so it'll be doing !undefined, resulting in true.

I would assume that the code is introducing a shim if it doesn't exist.

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