Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Regarding this code:

var name = "Jaguar";
var car = {
  name:"Ferrari",
  getName:function(){
    return this.name;
  }
};

alert((car.getName = car.getName)());

The output is: Jaguar.

Why does this object correspond to Window and not the object contained in the car variable?

It seems that the fact to reassign the object's function to itself leads to lose the assignment of this to the object when the function is called...

I'm trying to guess: Does it exist a kind of mechanism (using variable or other) that keep an eye on the non-reassignement of an object's function so that if that situation happens, this mechanism would prevent the assignement of the this keyword as usual (as being equals to the object)?

share|improve this question
2  
You are effectively doing a (function() { return this.name; })()... –  DCoder Oct 30 '12 at 16:35
    
It is a limitation of javascript. which can be solved by storing this in a variable and using it wherever possible. –  Mr_Green Jun 20 '13 at 13:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The reason is fairly subtle: this in JavaScript is determined entirely by how a function is called. To have this set to car during the call to getName, you have to call getName immediately upon retrieving it from the car object, like this:

car.getName() // or
car["getName"]()

(Or via Function#call or Function#apply, which let you specify the value for this explicitly.)

What you're doing in your example is effectively this:

// Set f to the result of the assignment expression,
// which is a reference to the getName function
var f = (car.getName = car.getName);

// Call it (separately)
f();

...which is different. Functions called in that way get this set to the global object (window, in browsers). (Except in strict mode; in strict mode this would be undefined.)

More (from my anemic blog):

Does it exist a kind of mechanism (using variable or other) that keep an eye on the non-reassignement of an object's function so that if that situation happens, this mechanism would prevent the assignement of the this keyword as usual (as being equals to the object)?

I'm not entirely sure I follow that question, but if you want to have a function that always has a preset this value, then yes, there are a couple of ways to do that.

One is to use the new ES5 function bind:

var name = "Jaguar";
var car = {
  name: "Ferrari"
};
car.getName = function(){
  return this.name;
}.bind(car);
alert((car.getName = car.getName)()); // "Ferrari"

bind returns a function that always has this set to the argument you give it.

The other way is to use a closure. And in fact, you can create a bind-like function in ES3 very easily:

function pseudoBind(func, thisArg) {
    return function() {
        return func.apply(thisArg, arguments);
    };
}

That doesn't do everything bind does, but it does the this part. Then you'd have:

var name = "Jaguar";
var car = {
  name: "Ferrari"
};
car.getName = pseudoBind(function(){
  return this.name;
}, car);
alert((car.getName = car.getName)()); // "Ferrari"

More on closures (again from the blog):

In a future spec, we'll be getting a declarative way of creating functions that have a preset this value (so-called "arrow functions" because the syntax for them involves uses => rather than the function keyword).

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer :) But one question: what do you think about the statement: (car.getName)() .Why doesn't it behave similarly as (car.getName = car.getName)()? Indeed, it would be similar as these both statements: var f = (car.getName); f(); but this case well returns Ferrari ... –  Mik378 Oct 30 '12 at 16:58
    
@Mik378: (car.getName)() and car.getName() are identical statements, there's no intervening boundary. But when you put the assignment in there: (car.getName = car.getName)(), then the () is applied to the result of the assignment, which is just a function reference with no object associated with it. You can read up on what the assignment statement does in glorious, if turgid, detail here, and how calls occur here. Brace yourself, it's arcane language. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Oct 30 '12 at 17:02
    
is applied to the result of the assignment, which is just a function reference with no object associated with it. That's explain why these statements: car.getName = car.getName; car.getName(); outputs Ferrari. Actually, all the tricky thing is about rules of assignment when enclosed with parentheses;) Thanks :) –  Mik378 Oct 30 '12 at 17:13
    
@Mik378: (Glad that helped.) Right. The main thing to remember is that function references are just function references, JavaScript doesn't have methods. And so unless bind or similar is used, this is set at the point of the call. The trick in the code you posted is where the point of the call was and what, if anything, was there between that and retrieving the function reference from the object. The answer was that there's an assignment statement in the way, which is where this got lost. –  T.J. Crowder Oct 30 '12 at 17:18
    
Excellent, I've just started learning ECMAScript and I already love it :) Re-Thanks –  Mik378 Oct 30 '12 at 17:39

Aaah, this resolution...Lets take a gander.

var toy = {
    log : function () { console.log(this); }
};
toy.log() //logs the toy object

So far, it seems like this resolution is static: Wherever the method was defined in, that's its this value.

But! What if we do this:

var sneakyBastard = toy.log;
sneakyBastard(); //logs Window

this is bound to the object it's called with. In the case of toy.log, you called log in the context of the toy object. But, sneakyBastard has no set context, so it's as if you've called window.sneakyBastard.

Now let's take a goose (goose? gander? no...) at your expression:

(car.getName = car.getName)()

...and what does an assignment return? The assigned value, in this case, a function, car.getName. We can break this expression into two:

var returnedValue = (car.getName = car.getName);
returnedValue();

...and from here it's obvious.

share|improve this answer

Instead of calling getName from the context of an object, you're calling it from the context of the return result of the grouping operator (which in this case there's no context).

In JavaScript, when there's no clear context defined, a default is used. The default is...

  • the global object when in strict mode

  • undefined when not in strict mode

share|improve this answer

You have put your function call parenthesis (()) so they call the result of the expression (car.getName = car.getName) (which is the value (a function) assigned to car.getName)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.