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so my homework is asking me only for class methods, but it's requiring i turn in a .java and a .class file. well i've got code that theoretically should work, but it won't compile no matter what i try. for example here's one:

public class findFourLetterWord(String[] strings) {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
   for (int i = 0; i < strings.length; i++)
      if (strings[i].length()==4)
          return strings[i];
   return null;
}
}

and here's the errors i'm getting:

8 errors found:
File: D:\School\CSC 2310\hw5_elemmons1\FindFourLetterWord.java  [line: 9]
Error: The public type findFourLetterWord must be defined in its own file
File: D:\School\CSC 2310\hw5_elemmons1\FindFourLetterWord.java  [line: 9]
Error: Syntax error on token "(", { expected
File: D:\School\CSC 2310\hw5_elemmons1\FindFourLetterWord.java  [line: 9]
Error: Syntax error on token ")", ; expected
File: D:\School\CSC 2310\hw5_elemmons1\FindFourLetterWord.java  [line: 9]
Error: Syntax error, insert "}" to complete Block
File: D:\School\CSC 2310\hw5_elemmons1\FindFourLetterWord.java  [line: 11]
Error: Cannot make a static reference to the non-static field strings
File: D:\School\CSC 2310\hw5_elemmons1\FindFourLetterWord.java  [line: 12]
Error: Cannot make a static reference to the non-static field strings
File: D:\School\CSC 2310\hw5_elemmons1\FindFourLetterWord.java  [line: 13]
Error: Cannot make a static reference to the non-static field strings
File: D:\School\CSC 2310\hw5_elemmons1\FindFourLetterWord.java  [line: 14]
Error: Void methods cannot return a value

any suggestions?

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2  
Ouch. Drop the parameter off the class declaration. public class FindFourLetterWord {...} Also capitalize the first letter of the classname –  Arun Manivannan Oct 30 '12 at 16:39
    
Also, FindFourLetterWord.java start with a capital F, the class name with a normal f. The name of the public class and of the .java file must match. –  Pierre Henry Oct 30 '12 at 16:40
    
Quick Google search brought up this. :P –  Miguel Oct 30 '12 at 16:41
1  
Your problem here is that you rushed into it. Read up on the basics. (I know that you probably don't have the time, but that's the best way to fix this). –  keyser Oct 30 '12 at 16:42
    
crazy thing is i've been doing pretty well in this class all semester, but i've taken a week off and it's like i forgot everything. i'll read up some more, thanks guys. –  Evan Lemmons Oct 30 '12 at 16:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Assuming you are running Eclipse as your IDE, if you rearrange your code to something like this:

public class FindFourLetterWord {

  public static void main(String[] args) {

     for (int i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {

        if (args[i].length() == 4) {
           System.out.println(args[i]);
           break;
        }
     }
  }

}

and then save the changes (which automatically triggers the compilation), you can run your compiled program (.class file) from a command line, with a few arguments (namely contained in args), being the words search list:

$> cd /path/to/your/FindFourLetterWord.class/file
$> java FindFourLetterWord aba abba ab a

You'll get the first 4-letter word among the words specified (abba).
This way you essentially invoked main method of the class (supplying it with a few String arguments), which is the entry point for each Java program.
As others already said, try to pick up on the basics first.

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  • For a start, name your class like your file: FindFourLetterWords with a cap.
  • Remove the (String[] strings) from the class declaration (it's on the main method already)
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"length" is a property of arrays, not a method, no parentheses required.

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He's using length correctly - in one case it is applied to an array and in the other it is applied to a String. –  DaveRlz Oct 31 '12 at 9:38
    
You're right. That's what I get for reading the code too quickly. –  rgettman Oct 31 '12 at 17:06

You need to get started with a tutorial on Java for beginners or First steps in Java.

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I think perhaps you need to do

public class FindFourLetterWord {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
       for (int i = 0; i < strings.length; i++){
         if (strings[i].length()==4)
            System.out.println(strings[i]);
       }
    }
}

this will print out the four letter words that you input.

Take a look at the java tutorial on methods and classes for more information.

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You have a number of problems in your source. You really should find a decent intro book as the mistakes you are making are elementary mistakes.

The first error message indicates that the class public class findFourLetterWord needs to be in its own file that has the name of findFourLetterWord.java however capitalization is required and your file name begins with a capital letter f rather than a lower case letter f as your class name starts. So capitalize the first letter of your class.

You do not provide arguments to a class the way that you are doing it. You are treating the class like it is a method. The methods within a class take parameters or arguments however the class itself does not.

Next, a static method within a class can not access class methods that are not static. You need to understand the difference between static methods and variables which are always there and dynamic methods and variables that are created when an object is created from a class.

A class is a description or template for the creation of an object. Until an actual object is created, the methods and variables that are not static are not available. However static methods and variables can be accessed without actually creating an object from a class.

So you need something like the following which I have not tested or even compiled so there may be errors however it will get you started. However there are several ways to do this and this is just a rough draft of one approach that uses objects and new to demonstrate the difference between static and non-static variables and methods.

public class FindFourLetterWord {
   String [] myArgs;
   // constructor for the class
   public FindFourLetterWord (String [] args) {
       myArgs = args;
   }

   public String FindWord () {
       for (int i = 0; i < myArgs.length; i++)
          if (myArgs[i].length() == 4)
              return myArgs[i];
       }
       return null;
   }

   // the main where processing starts
   public static void main(String[] args) {
       FindFourLetterWord myObj = new FindFourLetterWord(args);

       String  foundWord = findWord();
       if (foundWord == null) {
           System.out.println ("no word found");
       } else {
          System.out.println ("Found word " + foundWord);
       }
   }
}
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