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Given this code:

void FrMemCopy(void *to, const void *from, size_t sz)
{
    size_t sz8 = sz >> 3;
    size_t sz1 = sz - (sz8 << 3);

    while (sz8-- != 0) {
        *((double *)to)++ = *((double *)from)++;
    }

    while (sz1-- != 0) {
        *((char *)to)++ = *((char *)from)++;
    }
}

I am receiving target of assignment not really an lvalue warnings on the 2 lines inside the while loops.

Can anyone break down those lines?

a cast then an increment?

What is a simplier way to write that?

What does the error mean?

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4  
Simpler way is memcpy(to, from, sz) –  stark Oct 30 '12 at 16:46
2  
The code is trying to be efficient by copying 8 bytes at a time by using double instead of doing the copy one byte at a time. There are multiple problems with the code. It assumes that the addresses are 8-byte aligned. It then plays fast and loose with the expressions. Frankly, you'd do better with memmove() or memcpy(), but if you must play this way (and can live with the address alignment constraints, or bus errors or poor performance when you get the constraints wrong), then there are now a couple of answers that look as though they get it right. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 30 '12 at 16:55
    
@Jonathan, Thanks, this is helpful –  Jason Oct 30 '12 at 17:05
1  
Also see: Duff's device –  TBohne Oct 30 '12 at 17:06

6 Answers 6

It does not like the *((char*)to)++ statement.

Try this:

void FrMemCopy(void *to, const void *from, size_t sz)
{
    size_t sz8 = sz >> 3;
    size_t sz1 = sz - (sz8 << 3);
    double * tod = (double *) to;
    double * fromd = (double *) from;
    while (sz8-- != 0) {
        *(tod++) = *(fromd++);
    }

    char * toc = (char *) tod;
    char * fromc = (char *) fromd;
    while (sz1-- != 0) {
        *(toc++) = *(fromc++);
    }
}
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can you explain a bit why it complains about the (char*)to++? –  Jason Oct 30 '12 at 16:56
1  
It would complain about (char *)to++ because you can't increment a void *. It actually complains about *((char *)to)++ because (char *)to isn't an lvalue; it's the result of casting an lvalue expression which is not itself an lvalue. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 30 '12 at 16:57
1  
You're using the wrong addresses in the second loop -- it needs to copy from where the first loop stopped, not from the initial address. –  Chris Dodd Oct 30 '12 at 17:00
    
Thanks Chris, fixed the bug. –  therealsachin Oct 30 '12 at 17:04

You can't apply ++ to the result of a cast, only to an lvalue (a variable). So you need to create new variable with the appropriate types for the increments:

void FrMemCopy(void *to, const void *from, size_t sz)
{
    size_t sz8 = sz >> 3;
    size_t sz1 = sz - (sz8 << 3);

    double *to1 = (double *)to;
    double *from1 = (double *)from
    while (sz8-- != 0) {
        *to1++ = *from1++;
    }

    char *to2 = (char *)to1;
    char *from2 = (char *)from1;
    while (sz1-- != 0) {
        *to2++ = *from2++;
    }
}
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I tried to rewrite it in a way that no warning appears:

void FrMemCopy(void *to, const void *from, size_t sz)
{
    size_t sz8 = sz >> 3;
    size_t sz1 = sz - (sz8 << 3);

    double *xto = (double *)to;
    double *xfrom = (double *)from;
    while (sz8-- != 0) {
        *xto++ = *xfrom++;
    }

    char *cto = (char *)to;
    char *cfrom = (char *)from;
    while (sz1-- != 0) {
        *cto++ = *cfrom++;
    }
}
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The result of explicit type conversion is rvalue in this case - according to 5.4.1 of C++11 Standard. You cannot apply increment operator to rvalue, it shall be lvalue. See C++ value category for details.

Use temporary variables to obtain required effect:

double* to_dbl = static_cast<double*>(to);
double* from_dbl = static_cast<double*>(from);

while(sz8-- != 0)
{
    *(to_dbl++) = *(from_dbl++);
}
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You are performing an increment operation on the LValue (Left side value of the assignment operator). Logically and by definition, a LValue must always be a variable. It cannot be a constant. When you are performing an increment operation, it is leaving a constant value on the Left Side which is giving you the error.

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First before answering let me just say: Don't try to out-micro-optimize your compiler/library. The compiler writers will win something like 99 times out of 100. Use std::copy or memcpy depending on the types you're copying and needs.

Other answers have noted that you can solve the immediate compilation errors with temporary variables.

I don't recommend this under any circumstances do the following, but I believe you can also accomplish this by casting to a reference type:

void FrMemCopy(void *to, const void *from, size_t sz)
{
    size_t sz8 = sz >> 3;
    size_t sz1 = sz - (sz8 << 3);

    while (sz8-- != 0) {
        *((double *&)to)++ = *((double *&)from)++;
    }

    while (sz1-- != 0) {
        *((char *&)to)++ = *((char *&)from)++;
    }
}
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