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I have a problem with JavaScript.

I need to delete a list of divs from the parent div. So i tried this:

var divs = parent.getElementsByTagName("div");
if(divs != null)
{
    for(var v = 0; v < divs.length; v++)
    {
        parent.removeChild(divs[v]);
    }
}

But the problem is, that JS doesn't remove all of the divs. JS only removes the half of the list.

I also tried this:

var divs = parent.getElementsByTagName("div");
if(divs != null)
{
    for(var v = 0; v < divs.length; v++)
    {
        parent.removeChild(divs[0]);
    }
}

But with the same results

Please help?

share|improve this question
    
parent is the window object.. show us the complete code... –  udidu Oct 30 '12 at 17:03
    
Are you sure all the divs found with getElementsByTagName are actual children of the parent div? And not possibly descendents of the parent? If they are descendents, I'm not sure the behavior of removing a descendent –  Ian Oct 30 '12 at 17:03
    
The first should work fine. It will remove all <div> children of parent. Maybe you need to remove all nested <div> elements as well? –  VisioN Oct 30 '12 at 17:03
1  
And I don't think divs will ever be null. The returned value from getElementsByTagName is a HTMLCollection - technically an array. So you would want to check for .length > 0, not null. –  Ian Oct 30 '12 at 17:10
1  
@ianpgall: Correct. The null check is pointless. getElementsByTagName will return an empty list if no elements are found. Plus the loop takes care of the case where the list is empty already. –  Matt Burland Oct 30 '12 at 17:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Two solutions:

1: count down

var divs = parent.getElementsByTagName("div");
if(divs != null)
{
    for(var v = divs.length - 1; v >= 0; v--)
    {
        parent.removeChild(divs[0]);
    }
}​

2: cache length:

var divs = parent.getElementsByTagName("div");
if(divs != null)
{
    for(var v = 0, len = divs.length; v < len; v++)
    {
        parent.removeChild(divs[0]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This won't work if a div being found is a descendent, not a child. It will throw an exception. You can't just use parent.removeChild on any node - jsfiddle.net/ujaSv - notice how the actual child div is removed first, but an exception is thrown (in the browser's console) for the nested one. –  Ian Oct 30 '12 at 17:19
    
That did the trick. I have this: for(var v = (divs.length -1); v >= 0; v--) { intervalSchema.removeChild(divs[v]); } –  Jownster Oct 30 '12 at 17:46
var divs = parent.getElementsByTagName("div");
while(divs[0]) {
    divs[0].parentNode.removeChild(divs[0])
}

The list returned by getElementsByTagName is live. This means it gets updated as you remove the DOM objects, so you length isn't the same on each cycle.

Here's a fiddle.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 but .length on a live list does a recalculation, and is a bit expensive. I'd do this instead: while(divs[0]) parent.removeChild(divs[0]); –  I Hate Lazy Oct 30 '12 at 17:16
1  
Why the -1 vote? –  I Hate Lazy Oct 30 '12 at 17:17
    
@user1689607: Fair enough. Good point. I'll update my answer. –  Matt Burland Oct 30 '12 at 17:18
    
Oh, I see why. Each div may have a different parent. Can't tell from the question. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 30 '12 at 17:19
    
This won't work if a div being found is a descendent, not a child. It will throw an exception. You can't just use parent.removeChild on any node - jsfiddle.net/ujaSv - notice how the actual child div is removed first, but an exception is thrown (in the browser's console) for the nested one. –  Ian Oct 30 '12 at 17:20

Why don't you try something like:

var divs = parent.getElementsByTagName("div");
if (divs.length > 0) {  // Technically unnecessary, as the for loop just won't run if there aren't any elements returned
    for (var v = divs.length; v >= 0; v--) {
        divs[v].parentNode.removeChild(divs[v]);
    }
}

As an explanation of why this is correct, the use of removeChild must be used to remove an actual child of the parent node. If div[v] is a descendent (you know, like nested inside of another element - not a div - that is an actual child of parent). This is the safe way to remove an element when you have a reference to it. You guarantee the parent node of the element is removing it, and therefore is valid. If you check your console for trying to use parent.removeChild like yours and others code, there is an exception thrown for any descendent - http://jsfiddle.net/ujaSv/

Although it's important to point out that a better alternative to a for loop for this is:

while (divs[0]) {
    divs[0].parentNode.removeChild(divs[0]);
}

I did not think of this brilliance - this was decided in another answer/comment area.

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