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Hi I was playing around with TMP and was thinking of generating of a class that looks something like:

template<typename T, typename LogFunc>
class
{

(where LogFunc should be defaulted to "nop" function)

Idea is to have a class that defines some functionality for instances of type T, for example checks if the number is even, and also has the option to log by calling

void memberFunc(T& t)
{
  LogFunc(t); 
}

or maybe

void memberFunc(T& t)
{
  LogFunc lf;
  lf(t);
}

Can it be done? From reading A on SO, lambdas are kind of problematic as templ params. BTW if somebody cares this is what I tried but it prints out

:(

share|improve this question
1  
Lambdas are not types, they can't be passed as template parameters. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 30 '12 at 17:35
    
You really can't just create a no-op struct to use as the default parameter? It has to be a runtime-polymorphic functor or a lambda? struct noop { void operator() (const T&) {} }; is just too much code for you? Just because Lambdas exist doesn't mean you should forget about everything else. –  Nicol Bolas Oct 30 '12 at 17:39
    
there is decltype :) though idk how to use it in this case(see the link). –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 30 '12 at 17:42
    
@NicolBolas it is not just point of default noop , it is about actually specifying the param when I want it. –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 30 '12 at 17:43
    
Er, unless I am misunderstanding, in your pastebinned code you never actually set log_func to a value. You defined lambdada, but you only ever make use of its type, not the actual value. Why would you expect that code to show anything but :(? –  Rook Oct 30 '12 at 17:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that the type of a lambda is a compiler-enforced singleton; it has only one value, which is the lambda itself; furthermore, the type has a deleted constructor. So you can't pass lambdas as part of a template instantiation, even with decltype. But there's nothing stopping you from passing them as constructor arguments.

However, here we run into another problem: constructor arguments are not used to deduce a template instantiation (which is why the standard library provides utilities like make_pair and make_tuple). So we need a templatized factory function.

With all that, the solution is pretty simple:

template<typename T, typename LogFunc>
class Foo {
  public:
    Foo(const T& t, LogFunc fn) : t_(t), lfn_(fn) {}
    //...

  private:
    T t_;
    LogFunc lfn_;
};

struct Noop {
  template<typename...A>
  void operator()(A...) { };
};

template<typename T, typename LogFunc=Noop>
Foo<T, LogFunc> make_foo(const T& t, LogFunc func=LogFunc()) {
  return Foo<T, LogFunc>(t, func);
}
share|improve this answer
    
can you provide simple use example. I cant get make_foo to work... auto l=[] (int i){return i >0;} ; make_foo<int, decltype(l)>(); –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 30 '12 at 19:44
1  
@NoSenseEtAl: You're not supposed to supply template parameters to make_foo; it can deduce them. That's the whole point of the factory function. Example here: ideone.com/KqCjIJ –  rici Oct 30 '12 at 19:54
    
WOW!, that is sick. :) It even works when i put the function in the class, not just with free function... though tbh I still didnt figured out HOW it works, but there is time... :D I guess like you said in the A we need to a way to tell the machinery what are templ args and for that we need templ factory that deduces types from inputs to itself. –  NoSenseEtAl Oct 30 '12 at 20:17
    
@NoSenseEtAl: By the way, the definition of Noop is the real hack in that answer. That particular definition, as long as it keeps working, allows you to use Noop in any environment whatsoever in which you need a Noop function with void return (and if a function doesn't return void, it can't reasonably be replaced with a no-op, no? because returning something is an op :) ). So it's feasible for a library header instead of providing a specialized one for every instance. I'm still amazed it works. –  rici Oct 30 '12 at 20:56

This will not answer directly, but gives a number of hints about what you did.

The LogFunc parameter is a type (not an object), hence

  • LogFunc(t) creates a temporary LogFunc giving t as parameter (you are in fact calling the LogFunc::LogFunc(T&) contructor).
  • LogFunc lf; lf(t); creates a stack-living default contructed Logfunc, named lf, and lf(t) calls its LogFunc::operator()(T&) member function.
  • LogFunc()(t) creates a temporary default-constructed LogFUnc and calls operator()(T&) on it.

About lambdas, they are in fact classes whose constructor takes the captured varaibles, and whose operator() takes the parameters you declare. But they exist only "internaly" to the compiler, and don't have a "name" you can refer to.

What you can do is deduce its type with a decltype, or with a free-function.

Typically a parametric functional class stores a frunction object, initialized at construction.

#include <iostream>

template<class Fn>
class LogFunc
{
public:
    LogFunc(Fn f) :fn(f) {}

    template<class T>
    void memberFunc(T& t)
    { fn(t); }
private:
    Fn fn;
};

template<class Fn>
LogFunc<Fn> makeLogFunc(Fn f)
{ return LogFunc<Fn>(f); }

int main()
{
    int x=5;

    auto lf = makeLogFunc([](int& a){ std::cout << a << std::endl; });
    lf.memberFunc(x);

    return 0;
}

compile as "g++ -pedantic -Wall -std=c++11", and will ouptut

5
share|improve this answer

The other answers are all fine, but you can also just pass in a constructor argument with a std::function<T>. That looks like this:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T> void someOther(T val){
  std::cout << "used other "<<val<<std::endl;
}

template <typename T> void noop(T val){
  std::cout << "noop "<<val<<std::endl;
}

template<typename T>
struct A{
  A(std::function<void(T)> f =noop<T> ) : mf(f){}
  void memberFunc(T valx){
    mf(valx);
  }
  std::function<void(T)> mf;
};

int main(){
  A<int> aNoop; ;
  A<float> aSomeOther{someOther<float>} ;
  aNoop.memberFunc(5);
  aSomeOther.memberFunc(3.55);
}

An alternative is to use functor classes, like this:

#include <iostream>
template <typename T> struct OtherC{
  void operator()(T v){ std::cout <<"other "<<v<<std::endl; };
};
template <typename T> struct NoopC{
  void operator()(T){ std::cout << "noop"<<std::endl; };
};
template<typename T, template <typename X> class F = NoopC >
struct A{
  static void memberFunc(T valx){ F<T>()(valx); }
};
int main(){
  A<int> aNoop; 
  A<float,OtherC> aSomeOther ;
  aNoop.memberFunc(5);
  aSomeOther.memberFunc(3.55);
}
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