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I'm struggling with how to properly use C# Generics. Specifically, I want to have a method that takes a Generic Type as a parameter and does different things based on the type of the Generic. But, I cannot "downcast" the Generic Type. See example below.

Compiler complains about the cast (Bar<Foo>) saying "Cannot convert type Bar<T> to Bar<Foo>". But at runtime the cast is OK since I've checked the type.

public class Foo { }

public class Bar<T> { }

// wraps a Bar of generic type Foo
public class FooBar<T> where T : Foo
{

    Bar<T> bar;

    public FooBar(Bar<T> bar)
    {
        this.bar = bar;
    }

}

public class Thing
{
    public object getTheRightType<T>(Bar<T> bar)
    {
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(Foo))
        {
            return new FooBar<Foo>( (Bar<Foo>) bar);  // won't compile cast
        }
        else
        {
            return bar;
        }
    }
}
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1  
Does it work if you go return new FooBar<Foo>(bar as Bar<Foo>)? –  IronMan84 Oct 30 '12 at 17:57
    
One advantage of using generics is type safety, but you are losing some type safety by returning object instead of a more specific type. Another advantage of generics is that the same code can be used for multiple types, but you lose some of this advantage by branching the implementation based on the type of the argument. I don't know what the real program looks like but perhaps these are an indicator that there is a better program structure possible. What is the purpose of the getTheRightType function? And how is the result used? –  Mike Oct 30 '12 at 18:13
    
Good point Mike. The above is just a simplified example abstracted from the real code. The real code relates to spreadsheet construction and a class Worksheet<I,F> where I and F are different data structure types. The Worksheet is rendered differently based on the runtime types of I and F. I should spend some more time with the patterns and trying to improve the program structure. But, deadlines, deadlines ... –  Mark Hansen Oct 30 '12 at 18:38
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2 Answers

The compiler can't know that Bar<T> can be cast to Bar<Foo> in this case, because it's not generally true. You have to "cheat" by introducing a cast to object in between:

return new FooBar<Foo>( (Bar<Foo>)(object) bar);
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The actual reasoning was once explained by Eric Lippert. It was a little more complex. After all the compiler could just emit code like in your example. Nothing in principle stands against it. –  usr Oct 30 '12 at 18:00
    
@usr, yes, I remember reading something like that on Eric's blog, but I can't find the exact link... –  Thomas Levesque Oct 30 '12 at 18:05
1  
Thanks! I would never have guessed that this would work. I'm used to Java where you can do the downcast at compile time, but get an exception at runtime if the cast fails. –  Mark Hansen Oct 30 '12 at 18:32
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This should do the trick, and you won't have to cast to object first.

public class Thing
{
    public object getTheRightType<T>(Bar<T> bar)
    {
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(Foo))
        {
            return new FooBar<Foo>(bar as Bar<Foo>);  // will compile cast
        }
        else
        {
            return bar;
        }
    }
}
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This works for me as long as I add where T : class constraint to the function definition. –  Josh Feb 6 at 18:36
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