Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C# I'm trying to create a list of objects and when a new thing is added to the list, it is checked to make sure the same ID isn't used. I have the solution in Linq but I'm trying to do it without linq.

public void AddStudent(Student student)
        {
            if (students == null)                               
            {
                students.Add(student);                          
            }
            else
            {
                if ((students.Count(s => s.Id == student.Id)) == 1)   

                  // LINQ query, student id is unique
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Error student " 
                  + student.Name + " is already in the class");
            }
            else
            {
                students.Add(student);
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Your first line will throw an error if students is null. –  justnS Oct 30 '12 at 18:02
    
what type is students ? –  Micah Armantrout Oct 30 '12 at 18:03
    
I think your first line should be if (students.Count == 0) assuming you are working with a List –  justnS Oct 30 '12 at 18:05
1  
Any reason you're not using a Dictionary? –  Jon B Oct 30 '12 at 18:06
1  
A note on the existing code: Get into the habit of using Any() instead of Count() == 1 and similar constructs, that can give you great performance improvements once you go into various abstraction frameworks. –  Christoffer Oct 30 '12 at 18:18

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Another approach would be to use a HashSet instead of a List.

The Student class:

public class Student
{
    private int id;

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return this.id;
    }
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        Student otherStudent = obj as Student;
        if (otherStudent !=null)
        {
            return this.id.Equals(otherStudent.id);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new ArgumentException();
        }

    }

    public int Id
    {
        get { return id; }
        set { id = value; }
    }

}

Then you can add stuff like this

    HashSet<Student> hashSetOfStudents = new HashSet<Student>();
    Student s1 = new Student() { Id = 1 };
    Student s2 = new Student() { Id = 2 };
    Student s3 = new Student() { Id = 2 };

    hashSetOfStudents.Add(s1);
    hashSetOfStudents.Add(s2);
    hashSetOfStudents.Add(s3);

The addition of s3 will fail because it has the same Id as s2.

share|improve this answer

You can override Student.Equals() and Student.GetHashCode() to check if the Student.Id is equal. If the student list inherits from List<Student>, you can just use the default Add() method. It will only add students with different Ids.

public class Student
{
    // ...

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        // Check for null values and compare run-time types.
        if (obj == null || GetType() != obj.GetType()) 
            return false;

        Student other = obj as Student;
        return this.Id == other.Id;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return this.Id.GetHashCode();
    }
}

public class StudentList : List<Student> { }

// Usage:

var students = new StudentList();
students.Add(student);
share|improve this answer

I would use a Dictionary

students Dictionary<int, Student> = new Dictionary<int, Student>();

then check to see if you already have that student

if (!students.ContainsKey(student.id))
{
      students.add(student.id, student);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
It's not so much a Map as it is a Set, so HashSet would be more appropriate. –  Servy Oct 30 '12 at 18:08
    
ok whats the diff between the two ? HashSet is faster with lots of data but other than that why ? –  Micah Armantrout Oct 30 '12 at 18:09
    
Actually, a HashSet really isn't faster, a Dictionary is implemented through the same computer science concept of a hash table that HashSet is (not to be confused with the C# type HashTable, which, is just a non-generic Dictionary. The difference is that a Dictionary (which is a "map") maps a Key in a set of keys to a Value; a Set is just a set of values. You can think of a Map as a Set of KeyValuePairs (which is effectively how it is implemented). The difference is more logical, and conceptual; you don't need a set of IDs and a set of students, you just need a set of students. –  Servy Oct 30 '12 at 18:18
1  
but isn't that kind of logic natively part of a Dictionary without overriding anything? –  Brad Oct 30 '12 at 18:25
1  
@Brad It's not natively a part of Dictionary, it's natively a part of int, if you decide to use that as a key. The amount of code would be pretty similar in either case, the point is that a Set would logically represent what is going on, unlike a Dictionary, because logically there isn't a mapping of information, there is simply a single set. –  Servy Oct 30 '12 at 18:29

A list of distinct items sounds awfully lot like a set

Update: Writing up a good motivation for how to select proper datastructures got a bit tedious, I'll just show you how you will write the above once you are more familiar with the .NET framework:

public void AddStudent(Student student)
{
    /* this.students is an ISet<Student> */
    if (!this.students.Add(student))
    {
       throw new ArgumentException("student");
    }
}

This of course assumes that Student has a suitable definition of Equals() and GetHashCode(). Depending on the concrete ISet type used you may actually get some nice side effects with a good definition of GetHashCode(), but that discussion is probably a bit out of the scope for this question.

share|improve this answer
    
It will also need a suitable implementation of GetHashCode. –  Servy Oct 30 '12 at 18:19
    
@Servy Ah, that's true. I'll update the answer. –  Christoffer Oct 30 '12 at 18:22
    
For reference, the implementation of ISet<T> that you will likely want to use will be HashSet<T>. –  Servy Oct 30 '12 at 18:23

Make the structure to hold the students be a dictionary<int,Student> and check to see if the ID is already in the dictionary via ContainsKey.

share|improve this answer

Use the foreach loop:

    public void AddStudent(Student student)
    {
        if (students == null)
        {
            students.Add(student);
        }
        else
        {
            foreach (var s in students)
            {
                if (student.Id == s.Id)
                {
                    throw new ArgumentException("Error student "
                    + student.Name + " is already in the class");
                }
            }
            students.Add(student);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Many ways to do that, here a two possible solutions

1. You can iterate through your list.

bool alreadyInList = false;
foreach (var item in students) 
{
 if (item.Id == student.Id)
 {
    alreadyInList = true;
    break; // break the loop
 }
}

if (!alreadyInList)
{
   students.Add(student);
} 
else
{
     throw new ArgumentException("Error student " 
              + student.Name + " is already in the class");
}

2. Override the Equals method in you Student object and check using Contains.

public class Student 
{
    public override bool Equals(object x) 
    {
        return ((Student)x).Id == this.Id;
    }
}

if (!students.Contains(student)) 
{
   students.Add(student);
} 
else 
{
     throw new ArgumentException("Error student " 
              + student.Name + " is already in the class");
}

More Information:

share|improve this answer
    
This one worked perfectly, thank you. Thanks everyone else too. –  Robert Pallin Oct 30 '12 at 18:24
    
Glad to help! Have a nice day! –  dknaack Oct 30 '12 at 18:24
    
@dknaack This isn't really a good implementation; Lists weren't designed to be efficiently searched the way a set-based data structure would be, such as a HashSet or a Dictionary. Those solutions while they look similar at first glance, end up running substantially more effectively. –  Servy Oct 30 '12 at 18:32

First read all available id's into a list or array and then make sure that new id's don't match existing id's by checking list or array.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.