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I'm trying just to validate, on submitting the form that the username and password aren't empty.

Form:

<form action="usercheck.php" method="post">
    User: <input type="text" name="username" maxlength="10" />
    Pass: <input type="password" name="password" maxlength="10" />      
    <input type="submit" value="Submit" />
</form>

usercheck.php

<?php

class Vuln{

    public $username = $_POST['username'];
    public $password = $_POST['password'];

    public function ShowErrors(){
        if($this->username == '' || $this->password == ''){
            return 'username or password field blank';  
        }
        else{
            echo stripslashes('we\'re good');
        }   
    }

    $entered = new Vuln;
    echo $entered->ShowErrors();

}


?>

When I test, it says:

Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_VARIABLE, expecting T_FUNCTION on line :

    $entered = new Vuln;
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Iznogood, tereško, Jocelyn, generalhenry, Nikhil Oct 31 '12 at 4:06

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
why not just echo "we're good"? – Marc B Oct 30 '12 at 18:32
    
Should use bcrypt, rule of thumb at this point in the game ;) (just a suggestion) – wesside Oct 30 '12 at 18:33
1  
@bigman: He hasn't done anything with them yet. He didn't even process them, not to mention save them to a database. Hashing is still several steps away for him at this point ;) – Madara Uchiha Oct 30 '12 at 18:36
    
@MarcB - I wonder how this provides value as a response. --bigman - I'm not even onto hashing or cryptography yet, but thanks :) – CodeTalk Oct 30 '12 at 18:42
1  
lol, I even wrapped it in parenthesis stating just a suggestion and I still get two responses like I did something wrong, lol – wesside Oct 30 '12 at 18:45
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't have code inside a class definition like that

    class Vuln {
       //> Your class definition
    }

    //> Outside of the class

    $entered = new Vuln;
    echo $entered->ShowErrors();

I strongly suggest you to read all the basics from PHP Doc

share|improve this answer
    
Good suggestion here. Thanks Yes123 – CodeTalk Oct 30 '12 at 18:37

Part of your code is placed directly in the class:

$entered = new Vuln;
echo $entered->ShowErrors();

Those should be placed outside the class definition. As mentioned below, change:

public $username = $_POST['username'];
public $password = $_POST['password'];

to

public $username;
public $password;

and initiate variables in constructor or outside the class.

share|improve this answer
1  
You're on the right track, but you missed that the references to $_POST also have to be moved into the constructor – TML Oct 30 '12 at 18:33
    
Correct you are, my friend, overlooked that one. – bbb Oct 30 '12 at 18:34

something like

$entered = new Vuln;
$entered->username = $_POST['username'];
$entered->password = $_POST['password'];
$entered->ShowErrors();

you are currently instantiating your class from within your class.

edit: added for more clarification - this instantiates the class and should be outside the class. remove the instantiation that is within the class.

another edit changed the variable name to match example

share|improve this answer
    
How can I add checking for empty string? Does this all above go outside of the class? – CodeTalk Oct 30 '12 at 18:34
    
yes that is all outside of your class, you see the last line calls the function in your class that does your work – NappingRabbit Oct 30 '12 at 18:35
    
if you want some work done at the time of instantiation you can add a constructor function. php.net gives better general examples than I can. This is specific to your example. – NappingRabbit Oct 30 '12 at 18:36

The code for execution of an object shouldn't be found inside of the class definition.

You probably meant this:

<?php

class Vuln{

    public $username = $_POST['username'];
    public $password = $_POST['password'];

    public function ShowErrors(){
        if($this->username == '' || $this->password == ''){
            return 'username or password field blank';  
        }
        else{
            echo stripslashes('we\'re good');
        }   
    }


}

$entered = new Vuln;
echo $entered->ShowErrors();
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I mean't, but it is showing an error of syntax error, unexpected T_VARIABLE for line public $username = $_POST['username']; any clue why ? – CodeTalk Oct 30 '12 at 18:37
    
Right, I didn't notice. You can't have dynamic values as the default variable value. Have a constructor function (public function __construct()) which initializes those variables. – Madara Uchiha Oct 30 '12 at 18:46

Whats stopping you using

<form action="usercheck()" id="form" method="post">

and using the following JS

var theForm = document.forms["form"];
var user = theForm.elements["user"];
var pass = theForm.elements["pass"];

if(user.value==null || user.value=="")
{
alert("First name(s) must be filled out");
return false;
}

else if(pass.value==null || pass.value=="")
{
    alert("Last name must be filled out");
return false;
}

else
{
return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This can be easly bypassed – dynamic Oct 30 '12 at 18:37

You can't create object of the class from within the class itself. You must call the class when the form is submitted. Also change the class filename to something like vuln.php and update the usercheck.php to the following code.

     if($_POST){
        include("Vuln.php");
        $entered = new Vuln;
        echo $entered->ShowErrors();
     }

Hope it may help you.

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