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Is there any efficient way to find the number of divisors of a number (say n) which are not smaller than another number (say m). n can be up to 10^12. i thought about sieve algorithm & then find the number of divisors. my method check all the numbers from m to square root of n. But i think there is another way(efficient) to do that .

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3 Answers 3

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Following is an example program that computes the number of divisors of n that are larger than m. The largeDivs() code runs in time O(c) if there are c divisors. largeDivs() also starts with a representation of n as a factored number, with nset being a list of pairs of form (p_i, k_i) such that n = Product{p_i**k_i for i in 1..h}. Some example output is shown after the program. The check() routine is used to demonstrate that largeDivs() produces correct results. check() takes a long time for smaller values of m.

def largeDivs(n, nset, m):
    p, k = nset[-1]
    dd = 0
    if len(nset) > 1:
        nn, mm = n / p**k, m
        for i in range(k+1):
            dd += largeDivs(nn, nset[:-1], mm)
            mm = (mm + p-1)/p
    else:
        c, v = k+1, 1
        while v<m and c>0:
            c, v = c-1, v*p
        return c
    return dd

def check (n,m,s):
    if m<1:
        return s
    c = 0
    for i in range(m,n+1):
        if (n%i)==0:
            c += 1
    return c


tset = [(2,3),(3,2),(11,1),(17,1),(23,2)]
n = s = 1
for i in tset:
    s *= 1+i[1]
    n *= i[0]**i[1]
print 'n=',n, '  s=',s
m=0
for i in range(8):
    print 'm:', m, '\t', largeDivs(n, tset, m), '  Check:',check(n,m,s)
    m = 10*m + 5

Example output:

n= 7122456   s= 144
m: 0    144   Check: 144
m: 5    140   Check: 140
m: 55   124   Check: 124
m: 555  95   Check: 95
m: 5555     61   Check: 61
m: 55555    28   Check: 28
m: 555555   9   Check: 9
m: 5555555  1   Check: 1
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It's easy to find the divisors of a number if you know the prime factors; just take all possible combinations of the multiplicities of all the factors.

For n as small as 10^12, trial division should be a sufficiently fast factorization method, as you only have to check potential factors up to 10^6.

Edit: add discussion about "all possible combinations" and factoring by trial division.

Consider the number 24505 = 5 * 13 * 13 * 29. To enumerate its divisors, take all possible combinations of the multiplicities of all the factors:

5^0 * 13^0 * 29^0 = 1
5^0 * 13^0 * 29^1 = 29
5^0 * 13^1 * 29^0 = 13
5^0 * 13^1 * 29^1 = 377
5^0 * 13^2 * 29^0 = 169
5^0 * 13^2 * 29^1 = 4901
5^1 * 13^0 * 29^0 = 5
5^1 * 13^0 * 29^1 = 145
5^1 * 13^1 * 29^0 = 65
5^1 * 13^1 * 29^1 = 1885
5^1 * 13^2 * 29^0 = 845
5^1 * 13^2 * 29^1 = 24505

It's also not hard to factor a number by trial division. Here's the algorithm, which you can translate to your favorite language; it's plenty fast enough for numbers up to 10^12:

function factors(n)
    f = 2
    while f * f <= n
        if n % f == 0
            output f
            n = n / f
        else
            f = f + 1
    output n

Let's look at the factorization of 24505. Initially f is 2, but 24505 % 2 = 1, so f is incremented to 3. Then f = 3 and f = 4 also fail to divide n, but 24505 % 5 = 0, so 5 is a factor of 24505 and n is reduced to 24505 / 5 = 4901. Now f = 5 is unchanged, but it fails to divide n, likewise 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, but finally 4901 % 13 = 0, so 13 is a factor of 4901 (and also 24505), and n is reduced to 4901 / 13 = 377. At this point f = 13 is unchanged, and 13 is again a divisor, this time of the reduced n = 377, so another factor of 13 is output and n is reduced to 29. At this point 13 * 13 = 169 is greater than 29, so the while loop exits, and the final factor of 29 is output; this works because if n=pq, then one of p or q must be less than the square root of n (except in the case where p and q are equal and n is a perfect square), and since we have already done trial division by all the p and q less than the square root of 29, it must be prime, and thus the final factor. So we see that 24505 = 5 * 13 * 13 * 29.

I discuss these kinds of algorithms in my essay Programming with Prime Numbers.

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but checking all possible combination is very time consuming ! isn't it? –  palatok Oct 30 '12 at 20:38
    
No. I'll edit my response and add an example. –  user448810 Oct 30 '12 at 23:12
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It depends on the application, but if performance is such an issue I'd use a pre-generated hash table. Obviously 10^12 entries might be impractical (or at least undesirable) to store in memory, so I'd do division tests up to the kth prime number, generating hash table entries only for numbers not divisible by those first k prime numbers.

For example, though crudely written and untested, this should give you an idea:

int   number   = 23456789;
int   primes[] = {2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 0};
int   pfactors = 0;
int*  prime = primes;
float temp;

// check until we reach the end of the array (0)
while (prime)
{
    // divide by prime and check if result is integer
    temp = (float)number/*prime;
    if (temp == floor(temp))
    {
        // if so, increment count of prime factors and loop (same prime again!)
        pfactors++;
        number = (int)temp;
    }
    else
    {
        // else try the next prime
        prime++;
    }
}

// finally, rely on hash table magic
pfactors += pregenerated_hash[number];
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what is stored in the hash ? –  palatok Oct 30 '12 at 20:56
    
The proportion of numbers not divisible by any of the first k primes thins out rather slowly. For the primes less than 20, that leaves about 17.1%, for the primes less than 100, still about 12%, for the primes less than 1000, about 8.1%, 10000: 6.1%. You'd need a pretty large hash table even if you discard all numbers divisible by any prime less than 1 million - which would leave you with the primes between 1 million and 10^12 - there are 37607912018 primes not exceeding 10^12, so your hash table would have more than 3.76*10^10 entries. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 30 '12 at 22:36
    
@DanielFischer - Very informative, thank you. I will delete this answer in a future sweep. –  Andrew Cheong Oct 30 '12 at 23:53
    
don't delete this answer. negative evidence is evidence too. :) –  Will Ness Nov 4 '12 at 7:55
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