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Code is as follows:

/* set.h */
struct setElement{
  char *element;
  setElement *next;
};

typedef struct setElement *Set;  //Set is now the equivalent of setElement*

Set a;    

setInit(&a);

/* setInit function declaration @ setInit.c */

int setInit(Set *a){
  (*a)->element = "asdf";  //results in a seg fault
}

Trying to malloc 'a' works, but if I try to access any member within the set 'a' doesn't work. I understand I'm passing a reference of the set from the main() function to setInit, so I believe the pointer contained within setInit is addressing the memory allocated by 'Set a' in the main() function, so a malloc wouldn't be required...

Iunno. Help is appreciated :)

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4  
Gah, totally confusing when Set is typedef'd to a pointer. Don't do that! Or at least, call it SetPtr or something. –  Greg Hewgill Oct 30 '12 at 18:54
    
I agree. It is also confusing that a is both a Set (i.e. a pointer to setElement) one place, and a Set* (i.e. a setElement**) another place. –  amaurea Oct 30 '12 at 19:03
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that you have not allocated the setElement you are trying to assign to. In the main part of the code you are creating a Set, which is just a pointer to a setElement. This pointer is never set to point to anything sensible. I.e. you need something like

Set a = malloc(sizeof(setElement));
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Even with my sloppy code, you gots it. I was trying to do malloc() within the initSet.c file as opposed to where they're declared in main(). Thanks man. –  Matt Mackie Oct 30 '12 at 21:35
    
ITYM sizeof(struct setElement) (or just sizeof(*a), as I wrote in my answer). Yours won't work in C, only in C++. –  glglgl Oct 30 '12 at 23:33
    
@MattMackie You can do it as well in initSet(), but there you should do *a = malloc(...). While having 2 different a variables, where the one is the address of the other, it can be confusing for the reader... –  glglgl Oct 30 '12 at 23:35
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Alas, it is unclear where exactly your variables are defined. I assume your main.c is something like

#include "set.h"

Set a;    

int main()
{
    setInit(&a);
}

If so, your a, which is a pointer by itself, should point to somewhere.

If your framework wants malloc()ed data, you should do

int main()
{
    a = malloc(sizeof(*a)); // *a is a struct setElement now, with 2 pointer-sized members.
    setInit(&a); // Now seInit should be able to operate on the struct as wanted.
}
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As @amaurea has mentioned, you'll need to make use of malloc() for your setElement structure. In addition to this, you need to do the same for the setElement struct's element member. A char* is merely a pointer to a char or char array and will not implicitly allocate anything.

int setInit(Set *a){
  (*a)->element = "asdf";  //results in a seg fault
}

Could be re-written

int setInit(Set *a){
  (*a)->element = malloc(sizeof("asdf"));
  strcpy((*a)->element,"asdf");
}

Which the above could be rewritten to take a second parameter of the actual element contents.

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