Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an inner class (non-static) which is using a reference to an enclosing class in its initialization. Will the inner class keep a reference to the enclosing class now?

class Enclosing {
  class Inner {
    private final ABC innerField = outerField.computeSomething();
  }

  private final XYZ outerField = something();
}

UPDATE

I am very much aware that one can reference the outer class with Enclosing.this.

But, if the class doesn't use the reference, must the reference be there after compilation? Is it necessary even if the reference is only used in the initialization?

Where does it say that an inner class always holds a reference to the outer class?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A non-static nested class always holds a reference to the enclosing class. In your example, you can reference the enclosing class from Inner as Enclosing.this.

JLS 8.1.3 "Inner classes and Enclosing Instances":

"An instance i of a direct inner class C of a class O is associated with an instance of O, known as the immediately enclosing instance of i. The immediately enclosing instance of an object, if any, is determined when the object is created (§15.9.2)."

share|improve this answer
    
Where does it say it always holds a reference--even if you never use it? –  Michael Deardeuff Oct 30 '12 at 20:15
    
For reference, I'm looking through JLS 8.1.3 "Inner classes and Enclosing Instances," and I don't see it anywhere docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-8.html#jls-8.1.3 –  Michael Deardeuff Oct 30 '12 at 20:44
    
All inner classes are non-static. See the JLS. –  EJP Oct 30 '12 at 21:09
    
@EJP thanks for the clarification. i wasn't aware there was a distinction in terminology between "inner" and "nested". answer has been updated accordingly... –  stevevls Oct 30 '12 at 21:30
1  
@MichaelDeardeuff you're in the right section...see the part that says "An instance i of a direct inner class C of a class O is associated with an instance of O, known as the immediately enclosing instance of i. The immediately enclosing instance of an object, if any, is determined when the object is created (§15.9.2)." –  stevevls Oct 30 '12 at 21:33

Where does it say that an inner class always holds a reference to the outer class?

In the same place it defines the Outer.this syntax. The existence of this syntax is the existence of the reference. There is nothing to suggest that it is suppressed if not used.

share|improve this answer
    
And where is that defined? –  Michael Deardeuff Oct 30 '12 at 21:24
    
@MichaelDeardeuff In the Java Language Specification, of course. –  EJP Nov 17 '12 at 23:46
    
@downvoter Love your work. Taking issue with the JLS? –  EJP Nov 18 '12 at 5:36

Yes. An (non-static) inner class is just like any other instance member of the outer class, and as such always needs a reference of the enclosing class.

share|improve this answer
    
All inner classes are non-static by definition. –  EJP Nov 17 '12 at 23:47

There are two cases of inner-classes:

static inner-classes. The inner-class does not keep reference to the outer-class.

non-static inner-classes. The inner-class does keep a reference to the outer-class.

The case of a static inner-class that extends the outer-class is not as interesting as the non-static inner-class extending the outer-class.

share|improve this answer
    
where does it say it always keeps a reference if it isn't used? –  Michael Deardeuff Oct 30 '12 at 20:16
    
An inner class is by definition non-static. See the JLS. There are two kinds of nested classes. Answer is a contradiction in terms. –  EJP Oct 30 '12 at 21:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.