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I've been working with UTF-8 characters in my db, and have been using php inconv function to translate characters from utf-8 to ascii before putting them into the database.

This way, I thought, I would just translate a query into ASCII before querying the database. However, now I am seeing results which lead me to believe that mysql does this translation for me.

Does anybody know if that is correct, and I can skip the whole inconv in php (which isn't very effective anyway).

As an example, a search for 'lësci' returns 'Lesci' so that leads me to believe that a translation to ASCII is happening at some point.

The table is encoded with utf_8_unicode_ci. The field is varchar(255) with a fulltext index. The query is fairly simple "SELECT * FROM users WHERE name='lësci'" returns both 'lësci' and 'Lesci'.

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I just tried it with MySQL 5.0.75 and it doesn't have any problem as you describe. 'lësci' and 'Lesci' match only the respective strings. Can you give any more detail, like what version of MySQL are you using, and what is your table definition and also an example of a query that shows a problem? –  Bill Karwin Aug 21 '09 at 23:41
    
Thanks Bill, I'm using MySQL 5.027. The table is encoded with utf_8_unicode_ci. The field is varchar(255) with a fulltext index. The query is fairly simple "SELECT * FROM users WHERE name='lësci'" returns both 'lësci' and 'Lesci'. –  pedalpete Aug 22 '09 at 0:08
    
I still can't reproduce the behavior you describe. You've named a collation, but not a character set. Can you please just give the result of "SHOW CREATE TABLE users"? Also, what is the charset and collation of your session (i.e. did you do any SET NAMES command)? –  Bill Karwin Aug 22 '09 at 0:42
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1 Answer

I assume you use utf8_unicode_ci collation for the index. The collation did the trick. It's not really converting everything to ASCII but it handles the mapping between accented to raw letter.

Not sure about this specific one, utf8_generic_ci may not treat them as equal because its mapping is much simpler, therefore it's faster.

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that's what I was thinking, though I just realized that the index is not fulltext, just a regular index. –  pedalpete Aug 22 '09 at 1:20
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