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I have cronjob to run a script every day in specific time. The script is for conversion a large file (about 2GB) in specific folder. The problem is that not every day my coleague put the file in the folder before the time, written as cronjob.

Please help me to add commands in the script or to write second script for:

  1. Check if the file exists in the folder.
  2. If the previous action is true, check the file size every minute. (I would like to avoid conversion of still incomming large file).
  3. If filesize stays unchanged for 2 minutes, start the script for conversion.

I give you the important lines of the script so far:

cd /path-to-folder
for $i in *.mpg; do avconv -i "$i" "out-$i.mp4" ; done

10x for the help!

NEW CODE AFTER COMMENTS:

There is file in the folder!

#! /bin/bash


cdate=$(date +%Y%m%d)
dump="/path/folder1"
base=$(ls "$dump")

if [ -n "$file"]
then
    file="$dump/$base"
    size=$(stat -c '%s' "$file")
    count=0
    while sleep 10
    do
        size0=$(stat -c '%s' "$file")
        if [ $size=$size0 ]
        then $((count++))
             count=0
        fi
        if [ $count = 2 ]
        then break
        fi
    done
    # file has been stable for two minutes. Start conversion.

CONVERSION CODE

fi

MESSAGE IN TERMINAL: Maybe error???

script.sh: 17: script.sh: arithmetic expression: expecting primary: "count++"
share|improve this question
    
FYI: for me, using bash 3.2, the command sequence count=0; : $((count++)); echo $count; ((count++)); echo $count $(($count+3)) $((count+3)) echoes 1, 2, 5, 5. That is, both notations work. One possibility is that you aren't using bash after all — normally, the shebang doesn't use a space, but I'm not sure whether that matters. You do have a problem at if [ $size=$size0 ]; you must separate the arguments in a test: if [ $size = $size0 ]. That doesn't explain the reported error. You seem to be missing an else clause. You probably need to use : $((count++)) in the then clause. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 6 '12 at 14:09
    
@JonathanLeffler Below I have added new answer with working code thanks to your help. I have final question about the right way to loop the script if the file exists. Please see answer 2 when you have the time. 10x –  ispasov Nov 11 '12 at 7:53
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2 Answers 2

file=/work/daily/dump/name_of_dump_file

if [ -f "$file" ]
then
    # size=$(ls -l "$file" | awk '{print $5}')
    size=$(stat -c '%s' "$file")
    count=0
    while sleep 60
    do
        size0=$(stat -c '%s' "$file")
        if [ $size = $size0 ]
        then : $((count++))
        else size=$size0
             count=0
        fi
        if [ $count = 2 ]
        then break
        fi
    done
    # File has been stable for 2 minutes — start conversion
fi

Given the slightly revised requirements (described in the comments), and assuming that the file names do not contain spaces or newlines or other similarly awkward characters, then you can use:

dump="/work/daily/dump"                 # folder 1
base=$(ls "$dump")

if [ -n "$file" ]
then
    file="$dump/$base"
    ...code as before...
    # File has been stable for 2 minutes - start conversion
    dir2="/work/daily/conversion"       # folder 2
    file2="$dir2/$(basename $base .mpg).xyz"
    convert -i "$file" -o "$file2"
    mv "$file" "/work/daily/originals"  # folder 3
    ncftpput other.coast.example.com /work/daily/input "$file2"
    mv "$file2" "/work/daily/converted" # folder 4
fi

If there's nothing in the folder, the process exits. If you want it to wait until there is a file to convert, then you need a loop around the file test:

while file=$(ls "$dump")
      [ -z "$file" ]
do sleep 60
done

This uses a little-known feature of shell loops; you can stack the commands in the control, but it is the exit status of the last one that controls the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that this solution will work in Linux, but in other operating systems, stat may use different options. In FreeBSD and OSX, for example, you need to use use stat -f '%z' "$file" to set the size variable. Also, it's generally preferred to use bash's built-in [[ operator for if instead of the old Bourne /bin/[. Better performance, better habits. –  ghoti Oct 30 '12 at 20:30
    
The OS is Ubuntu 12.04 but do I have to put commands in the convertion script right after the row # File has been stable for 2 minutes — start conversion or I have to write a command to run the other script? –  ispasov Oct 30 '12 at 20:31
1  
@ispasov - you can do whatever you like, either add commands to this code or have it call an external code. Since you didn't post any code in your question, Jonathan wasn't really able to address your specific requirements in the script excerpt he posted. His answer definitely addresses what you posted in your question. –  ghoti Oct 30 '12 at 20:46
1  
You added the code fragment 45 minutes after I posted the answer I gave. It is not clear from the fragment you've given which of the .mpg files you are concerned about changing. You need to take the ideas from the answer script and apply them to your situation. We provide help; we try not to babysit people. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 30 '12 at 22:17
1  
@ghoti, [ is a bash builtin -- type -a [ –  glenn jackman Oct 31 '12 at 0:31
show 12 more comments
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, I finally made some working code as follows:

#!/bin/bash

cdate=$(date +%Y%m%d)
folder1="/path-to-folder1"

cd $folder1

while file=$(ls "$folder1")
      [ -z "$file" ]
do sleep 5 && echo "There in no file in the folder at $cdate."
done

echo "There is a file in folder at $cdate"
size1=$(stat -c '%s' "$file")
echo "The size1 is $size1 at $cdate"
size2=$(stat -c '%s' "$file")
echo "The size2 is $size2 at $cdate"
if [ $size1 = $size2 ]
then
echo "file is stable at $cdate. Do conversion."

Is the next line the right one to loop the same script???

else sh /home/user/bin/exist-stable.sh
fi

The right code after comments below is

else exec /home/user/bin/exist-stable.sh
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Is the next line the right way to loop the script? Answer: No. It runs the script again, but without completing the first, so you'll eventually run out of processes. At a pinch, you could use exec /home/user/bin/exist-stable.sh instead; that replaces the current process with a new one that reruns the script. It would probably be more conventional just to wrap an extra while true; do ...; done loop around the existing loop and the actions that follow it. (Or you could pause between iteratations: while sleep 15; do ...; done.) –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 11 '12 at 8:01
    
@JonathanLeffler I tried the "while" way with the difference between $size2 and $size1. It was something like: while [ $size1 = $size2 ] do script.sh done but something was not right. The script loops even if the file existed. –  ispasov Nov 11 '12 at 8:42
    
@JonathanLeffler also I have to make sure that the processes for filesize will run again if there is file in folder. That's why I need loop to the beginning of the file. –  ispasov Nov 11 '12 at 8:54
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