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This is the first time I'm finding the & parent selector extremely useful so that I don't need to redefine parents simply to modify a child element.

Of course this is actually easy with LESS, but I have to ask!

<div id="skrollr-body" class="nonav">
    <div class="skrollable">

    </div>
</div>


#skroller-body {
    .skrollable {
        margin-top:40px;

        .nonav & {
            // this parent selector lets me modify 
            // .skrollable without duplicating it
            margin-top:0px;

        }
    }
}

The output of .nonav & is .nonav #skroller-body .skrollable

I'm wondering if I can get #skroller-body.nonav .skrollable instead somehow without extra HTML markup (a wrapper div.nonav)?

Currently I'll just duplicate the parent

#skrollr-body {
    margin-top:40px;
    left:0;
    width:100%;

    .skrollable {
        margin-top:40px;
        position:fixed;
        z-index:100;
        .skrollable {
            position:absolute;

            .skrollable {
                position:static;
            }
        }
    }
    &.nonav {
            .skrollable {
                 margin-top:0px;
            }
    }
}

Or to save redundant output;

#skroller-body.nonav .scrollable { margin-top:0px; }

But the whole point here is CSS code that's easy to maintain and read.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

The docs tell us:

The & combinator [is] used when you want a nested selector to be concatenated to its parent selector, instead of acting as a descendant.

So:

#skroller-body {
        &.nonav {
            .skrollable {
                // stuff
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh yeah, that's a good point I don't need to duplicate the parent content! –  Yuji 'Tomita' Tomita Oct 30 '12 at 20:05

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