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I have a function like this:

function foo(canvas) {
    canvas.mousedown(function(e) {
        console.log(canvas); //undefined
    });
}

I'm calling foo on mouse click in a certain spot of the page.

Why is canvas undefined?

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Did you pass foo a parameter? –  SLaks Oct 30 '12 at 20:05
1  
hm... yes, jsfiddle works. my code is more complex, will see what else can be causing the problem... –  Ixx Oct 30 '12 at 20:10
6  
canvas should never evaluate to undefined inside the callback. The canvas variable cannot be re-assigned in the provided code (an object being mutated is another matter), and that particular console.log would only run if canvas.mousedown was valid (which implies canvas is not undefined). Thus, I call shenanigans. The reported behavior is either wrong or is not the whole story. –  user166390 Oct 30 '12 at 20:10
1  
@TML and others: Works fine for me in FF. It helps to set the background color on the canvas so you can see the damn thing! –  Matt Burland Oct 30 '12 at 20:14
1  
Working fine for me in both Chrome and Firefox on Win32. What version of Chrome are you using? Did you actually click on the canvas? SnagIt Screenshot of Chrome result –  TML Oct 30 '12 at 20:17

2 Answers 2

Your own answer is correct, once you gave the whole code example. You encountered a quirk of Javascript known as "variable hoisting." Your code is interpreted as:

function foo(canvas) {
    canvas.mousedown(function(e) {
        var i, canvas; //variable declarations moved to top of function scope
        console.log(canvas); //undefined
        //...
        for (i in array) {
            canvas = array[i].canvas;
            //...
        }
    });
}

See:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/var#var_hoisting

http://www.adequatelygood.com/JavaScript-Scoping-and-Hoisting.html

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem was this:

function foo(canvas) {
    canvas.mousedown(function(e) {
        console.log(canvas); //undefined
        //...
        for (var i in array) {
            var canvas = array[i].canvas;
            //...
        }
    });
}

I haven't time to investigate the exact reason. My guess is that the compiler puts a "var canvas" declaration at the start of the anonymous function, such that the variable is undefined when output in the console. Otherwise don't understand it yet.

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