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With the ListBox control it is possible to feed it a DataSource, name a DisplayMember and a ValueMember and through some magic it will display a field from the DataSource and return a selected ValueMember. It can work wit a linq-to-sql result without even knowing anyting specific about the table it is feed with.

Isn't Reflection and Attributes doing some magic? How does it work! I have a need to do something similar but I do not know where to start. I'm a beginner for LINQtoSQL.

This is what I want to do. I have a source table that I want to filter. The source table can be anything but will be originating from some DataContext.

var MySourceTable =
    from MyRecord in Context.GetTable<MySourceTable>()
    select new
    {
        Value = MyRecord.ID,
        Display = MyRecord.Name,
        FilterValue = MyRecord.Value
    };

In my control I want to be able to filter MySourceTable on some given value. The control does not know what table is used (MySourceTable in the example above) and the control does only know the three names, ID, Name and Value of the fields in the record it should use.

The filter query should look like the example below.

var MyTable
    from Record in MySourceTable
    where FilterValue == GivenValue
    select new
    {
        Value = Record.ID,
        Display = Record.Name,
    };

Can somebody advise me on where to start?

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1  
You seem to understand how to restrict the data set you get back from linqtosql. What precisely are yo uhaving a problem with? –  YYY Oct 30 '12 at 20:32
    
Are you looking for a way to generically pass in any MySourceTable, FilterValue and GivenValue and get back a MyTable? –  Bobson Oct 30 '12 at 20:56
    
To Bobson: Yes, I want to generically pass any MySourceTable in, be able to filter it on any given value (one) and get back a filtered result. –  PapaAtHome Oct 30 '12 at 21:42
    
To YYY: Well, I'm new to LINQtoSQL, basicly I have problems with every aspect for the moment. :-( What I describe is the general concept, not a working implementation. I can create something like MySourceTable and ListBox can work with it (tested) but I can't. I would like to know how to do that trick. –  PapaAtHome Oct 30 '12 at 21:46
1  
@PapaAtHome - I find the functional form of LINQ far easier to use than the reverse-SQL form. It'd be: var MyTable = MySourceTable.Where(x => x.FilterValue == GivenValue).Select(x => new { Value = x.ID, Display = x.Name}); –  Bobson Oct 31 '12 at 17:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I wrote a filter engine that takes in a Property and Value as a string, and is able to use that as a where clause.

IQueryable<T> FilterFunction<T>(IQueryable<T> query)
{
    ParameterExpression p = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "notused");

    Expression<Func<T, bool>> wherePredicate =
      Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(
          Expression.Equal(
            Expression.Call(Expression.Property(p, FilterProperty), "ToString", new Type[0]),
            Expression.Constant(FilterValue)), p);

    return query.Where(wherePredicate);
}

You should be able to pass in an Expression<Func<T, TResult>> built in a similar way into query.Select()

If I am understanding your question correctly, I believe this will work:

string DisplayProperty = "Name";
string ValueProperty = "ID";

IQueryable<Record> SelectRecordProperties<T>(IQueryable<T> query)
{
    ParameterExpression p = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "notused");

    MethodInfo ctorMethod = typeof(Record).GetMethod("Create");

    Expression<Func<T, Record>> selectPredicate =
      Expression.Lambda<Func<T, Record>>(
        Expression.Call(ctorMethod,
            Expression.PropertyOrField(p, DisplayProperty),
            Expression.PropertyOrField(p, ValueProperty)), p);

    return query.Select(selectPredicate);
}
class Record
{
    public static Record Create(string display, string value)
    {
        return new Record() { Display = display, Value = value };
    }
    public object Display { get; set; }
    public object Value { get; set; }
}

So for your full function you'd need to combine these two ideas so that your filtering works.

By the way, there are many possible ways to build the expression tree for this, there was some tool I've found at one point which would show you the expression tree I think, so you could manually write the linq query and see how .Net builds the expression, then modify this code to build it based on that to possibly get a more efficient expression tree.

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I will give it a try, thanks! –  PapaAtHome Nov 1 '12 at 21:19
    
This is the way to go. I can see the logic of it. Still having some problems with it but is solves my initial problem. –  PapaAtHome Nov 2 '12 at 13:28
    
It is the way to go but I have some severe problems with T, no information available. Problem not yet solved. –  PapaAtHome Nov 2 '12 at 20:45
    
Have you worked with generics before? You can replace all the instances of T with your object name to make it easier to write. –  Thymine Nov 6 '12 at 17:44
    
Yes I have worked with generics, a lot. The point s that the module where I want to do this does not have access to the class that I want to use for T. The best thing I can do is create a callback and use that. (Tested it and it works fine.) –  PapaAtHome Nov 10 '12 at 10:24

It looks like what you are missing is in the where condition on your query. It should look like this:

var MyTable = 
    from Record in MySourceTable
    where Record.FilterValue == GivenValue
    select new
    {
        Value = Record.ID,
        Display = Record.Name,
    };

GivenValue is presumably a local variable or property containing whatever you want to compare FilterValue against. But FilterValue is a property of the anonymous type that you created in your first query that created MySourceTable. In your second query, Record is an instance of that anonymous type, and you have to use that reference to the instance in all other parts of the query to reference the instance that you are checking for the where clause or selecting for the select clause. If you just put FilterValue there, then it has no idea what you mean.

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You are right, GivenValue is a local variable. When its value changes it triggers the execution of the query. What I don't know how to do is select the items 'Record.FilterValue', 'Record.ID' and 'Record.Name' on knowing them by name (aka as string) only. Another problem is using 'MySourceTable' which I can cast to IQuerable but then I'm left with nothing. I can't use is strait away and I can't convert it to IEnumerable, just to name two possible continuations. –  PapaAtHome Oct 30 '12 at 23:19
    
I'm not really sure what you're actually trying to do here, but you can get the value of any of the fields in your record object by doing Record.GetType().GetField("FilterValue").GetValue(Record).ToString(), replacing the FilterValue string with a string matching the name of any of the fields of your object. –  Mason Oct 31 '12 at 3:11

I found a way, it works but is not a completely satisfying method.

The 'problem' (compared to my original question) is that it does not use linq-to-sql for filtering the source. But it works and that is at the moment fine for me.

Recap: At a high level module I prepare a LINQtoSQL statement which will result in some IQueriable<Object>, effectively an IQueriable object. This object is given to a lower level module together with three names, one for the ID, one for the Display and one for filtering. When I need more control over the source, e.g. for unfiltered data that will result in huge results or for complex LINQtoSQL queries I will use a delegate function. That will give me all the control I want.

At a low level I have a IQueriable<Object> and no knowledge at all about the Object, except for wat Reflection can tell me. I generate a table of results that I want to use in a control-specific format. (the Record class). For anything more complex that my standard code cannot handle I offer a delegate that must result in some list of object in which the object must have at least a property named 'Display' and a property named 'Value'. Other properties are possible but will not be used.

This is the solution that I finaly got to work:

public partial class MySelector : UserControl
{
    class Record
    {
        public object Display { get; set; }
        public object Value { get; set; }
    }

    ....

    public string MyDisplayMember { get; set; }
    public string MyValueMember { get; set; }
    public string MyExternalMember { get; set; }

    ....

    static Object Filter(MySelector sender, Object criterium)
    {
        IQueryable source = sender.MySource as IQueryable;
        if (source == null) return null;

        List<Record> result = new List<Record>();

        // drawback: this foreach loop will trigger a unfiltered SQL command.
        foreach (var record in source)
        {
            MethodInfo DisplayGetter = null;
            MethodInfo ValueGetter = null;
            bool AddRecord = false;

            foreach (PropertyInfo property in record.GetType().GetProperties())
            {
                if (property.Name == sender.MyDisplayMember) 
                {
                    DisplayGetter = property.GetGetMethod();
                }
                else if (property.Name == sender.MyValueMember)
                {
                    ValueGetter = property.GetGetMethod();
                }
                else if (property.Name == sender.MyExternalMember)
                {
                    MethodInfo ExternalGetter = property.GetGetMethod();
                    if (ExternalGetter == null)
                    {
                        break;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        object external = ExternalGetter.Invoke(record, new object[] { });
                        AddRecord = external.Equals(criterium);
                        if (!AddRecord)
                        {
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                }
                if (AddRecord && (DisplayGetter != null) && (ValueGetter != null))
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
            if (AddRecord && (DisplayGetter != null) && (ValueGetter != null))
            {
                Record r = new Record();
                r.Display = (DisplayGetter == null) 
                    ? null 
                    : DisplayGetter.Invoke(record, new object[] { });
                r.Value = (ValueGetter == null) 
                    ? null 
                    : ValueGetter.Invoke(record, new object[] { });
                result.Add(r);
            }
        }
        return result;
    }
}
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