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Hello I have created a die with the help of a switch statement to show the right face of the die, now I was planning to rewrite this into an array but I don;t know how this should look like.. ( I am new to Java and it's just for learning purposes ) Can someone show me a little example of how it must look like?

here is the class that contains the switch statement:

package h05Dobbelsteen;

import java.awt.*;

import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class DobbelSteen extends JPanel {

private final static int SPOT_DIAMETER = 40; // diameter dobbelsteen rondjes
private int faceValue; // getoonde waarde op scherm

public DobbelSteen() {

}

/*
 * roll de dobbelsteen
 */
public int roll() {

    int val = (int) (6*Math.random() + 1); // bepaal getal tussen 1 - 6
    setValue(val);
    System.out.println(val);
    return val;

}

/*
 * set de waarde van de roll
 */
public void setValue(int spots) {
    faceValue = spots;
    repaint();
}

/*
 * get de waarde van de roll
 */
public int getValue() {
    return faceValue;
}

/*
 * teken de view van de dobbelsteen
 */
public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {

    int w = getWidth();  // Get height and width
    int h = getHeight();

    // Graphics naar 2d
    Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D)g;
    g2.setRenderingHint(RenderingHints.KEY_ANTIALIASING,
            RenderingHints.VALUE_ANTIALIAS_ON);

    //... Paint background
    g2.setColor(Color.WHITE);
    g2.fillRect(0, 0, w, h);
    g2.setColor(Color.BLACK);

    g2.drawRect(0, 0, w-1, h-1);  // Draw border

    switch (faceValue) {
        case 1:
            drawSpot(g2, w/2, h/2);
            break;
        case 3:
            drawSpot(g2, w/2, h/2);

        case 2:
            drawSpot(g2, w/4, h/4);
            drawSpot(g2, 3*w/4, 3*h/4);
            break;
        case 5:
            drawSpot(g2, w/2, h/2);
        case 4:
            drawSpot(g2, w/4, h/4);
            drawSpot(g2, 3*w/4, 3*h/4);
            drawSpot(g2, 3*w/4, h/4);
            drawSpot(g2, w/4, 3*h/4);
            break;
        case 6:
            drawSpot(g2, w/4, h/4);
            drawSpot(g2, 3*w/4, 3*h/4);
            drawSpot(g2, 3*w/4, h/4);
            drawSpot(g2, w/4, 3*h/4);
            drawSpot(g2, w/4, h/2);
            drawSpot(g2, 3*w/4, h/2);
            break;
    }
}

/*
 * Teken de spots
 */
private void drawSpot(Graphics2D g2, int x, int y) {
    g2.fillOval(x-SPOT_DIAMETER/2, y-SPOT_DIAMETER/2, SPOT_DIAMETER, SPOT_DIAMETER);
}

}
share|improve this question
    
did u mean use array instead of switch ?? –  PermGenError Oct 30 '12 at 20:57
    
Yes I want to use arrays instead –  Reshad Oct 30 '12 at 21:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

something like:

private class Point {
  int x;
  int y;
  Point(int x, int y) {
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
}

Point[][] pointSpecs = new Point[][] { {new Point( .5, .5) }, 
                                       {new Point(.25, .25), new Point(.75, .75)},
                                  ...};

This is a declaration of an array of arrays. The first index is the die value-1 (since java arrays are zero-indexed). At each position is an array of Points that need to be drawn. Just the multipliers are there which you would need to multiply by your width and height.

To use:

public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {

int w = getWidth();  // Get height and width
int h = getHeight();

// Graphics naar 2d
Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D)g;
g2.setRenderingHint(RenderingHints.KEY_ANTIALIASING,
        RenderingHints.VALUE_ANTIALIAS_ON);

//... Paint background
g2.setColor(Color.WHITE);
g2.fillRect(0, 0, w, h);
g2.setColor(Color.BLACK);

g2.drawRect(0, 0, w-1, h-1);  // Draw border

Point[] points = pointSpecs[faceValue-1];
for (Point point : points) {
  drawSpot(g2, w*point.x, h*point.y);
}

You'll need to fill in the rest of the point values...

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't understand how the first index of the array is -1, if Java arrays are zero-based. –  ignis Oct 30 '12 at 21:06
1  
right, i had a misplace paren. thanks –  Martin Serrano Oct 30 '12 at 21:08
    
hmm so why use an array in a array? –  Reshad Oct 30 '12 at 21:45
    
Because in your switch-block you have several points to be drawn for one case (e.g. case 4 or 6). Case = 1. dimension, list of points = 2. dimension of the multidimensional array. –  Andy Oct 30 '12 at 22:06
    
exactly. and for each case, you'll have to be fully explicit with the list of points. you can't do anything like the fall through that you did with the switch statement (which I think is generally a bad idea anyway; it leads to surprises (bugs) and hard to read code). –  Martin Serrano Oct 30 '12 at 22:15

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