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I'm trying to execute some sql using the following C# code:

IDbCommand objOracleCommand = CreateCommand(commandPart, connection, transaction);
objOracleCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();

I'm getting back a "ORA-00933: SQL command not properly ended" error.

commandPart is a string that looks like:

CREATE SEQUENCE seq_1
INCREMENT BY 1
START WITH 1
NOMAXVALUE
NOMINVALUE
NOCACHE
NOCYCLE
NOORDER

CREATE SEQUENCE seq_2 START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1

The commandPart is actually being read in from a text file. The original SQL has semi-colons like so:

CREATE SEQUENCE seq_1
INCREMENT BY 1
START WITH 1
NOMAXVALUE
NOMINVALUE
NOCACHE
NOCYCLE
NOORDER;

CREATE SEQUENCE seq_2 START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1;

This original snippet (with semi-colons) will run just fine in SQL Developer. If I run the original snippet via C# I get "ora-00911: invalid character". Any ideas?

Thanks, Eric

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2  
Try putting a semi-colon after NOORDER. If that doesn't fix it, try separating the two statements and execute them one at a time. –  Bob Jarvis Oct 30 '12 at 21:02

1 Answer 1

Your command part consists of two commands. Oracle is confused because it only expects one command.

You'll need to execute (ExecuteNonQuery) the two commands seperately.

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Hi, I put a ; at the end I get a ORA-00933: SQL command not properly ended. I put a ; in between the two queries and I get a ora-00911: invalid character error. I'm parsing a 300,000+ line sql file that's creating a blank database with my company's metadata. If I split it at the semi colons, It works until I get to function creation statements that have lots of statements, separated by semicolons. If I keep going down this route it seems I'll essentially wind up writing my own SQL parser. I have a hard time believe that Oracle can't handle multiple sql statements in a sql command. -Eric –  Eric Oct 31 '12 at 18:44
    
For your purpose, it's better to use SQL*plus. It'll correctly split and execute the commands including blocks of PL/SQL, stored procedures etc. If you do the splitting yourself, the rule is to split at semicolons except when you encounter DECLARE or BEGIN; then you'll have to split at the next slash (/) on a separate line. (Oracle has three languages: SQL, PL/SQL and SQL*plus. The slash is part of SQL*plus only.) –  Codo Oct 31 '12 at 22:17

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