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I'm using this function:

function playSound(file) {

MyAudio = new Audio(file);
MyAudio.play();

}

Unfortunately, I'm struggling to find a file type which will work in all browsers. Mp3 works in Chrome, Safari, IE but not FF and Opera, while .ogg files only seem to work in FF.

Any suggestions as to a way around this? I presume there is no way of programmatically detecting which browser is being used and then playing the appropriate file type? Any advise/ideas appreciated. Thanks.

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wav. Since it's mostly raw PCM plus a very simple header, I haven't seen a platform where it couldn't be played by default, although I may be wrong. –  user529758 Oct 30 '12 at 21:40
    
Use webm for Chrome, Firefox and Opera + wav for Firefox, IE, Safari and Opera. –  Vukašin Manojlović Oct 30 '12 at 21:42
    
Use feature detection, not browser detection! What types each browser supports will change over time; use canPlayType: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/HTMLMediaElement#Methods –  apsillers Oct 30 '12 at 21:48
    
@H2CO3 It appears that WAV is not supported in IE9, which seems a little crazy: garretwilson.com/blog/2012/01/17/ie9-html5-wav.xhtml –  apsillers Oct 30 '12 at 21:52
    
@apsillers 1. Who cares about IE? 2. Microsoft FAIL, it's their own format. –  user529758 Oct 30 '12 at 21:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Frustratingly, there is no universally playable type. WAV comes closest, but it is quite large and is not supported in IE9. You'll need to have multiple types available and choose a type the browser can play.

To do this, use feature detection, not browser detection. The media types that each browser supports will change over time, so your code that assumes Firefox can't play MP3 will probably be outdated a few years from now, when Mozilla adopts it (after the patents expire). Use canPlayType, which indicates if a given format is supported:

var audio = new Audio();
if(audio.canPlayType("audio/mpeg") == "probably") {
    playSound("myMedia.mp3");
} else if(audio.canPlayType("audio/webm") == "probably") {
    playSound("myMedia.webm");
}
// do check for other types...

Also, if you are writing the audio tag as HTML, you can use multiple <source> tags, and the browser will play the first one it can:

<audio controls="controls">
    <source src="mymedia.ogg" type="audio/ogg" />
    <source src="mymedia.mp3" type="audio/mpeg" />
    Update your browser! This sentence is fallback content for browsers that do not support the audio element at all.
</audio>

EDIT: If you want to test for Ogg audio support, you want to test for Ogg Vorbis specifically. Ogg is a "container" format that can hypothetically use other codecs besides Vorbis and Theora (but I don't know of any other codecs in widespread use, so this appears to be unlikely for now). You can test for Ogg Vorbis like so:

audio.canPlayType('audio/ogg; codecs="vorbis"') == "probably";

Note that canPlayType has three possible return values:

  • "probably" - the media type can almost certainly be played
  • "maybe" - the media type might be playable. This is what is returned when you ask about general Ogg support in a browser has Ogg support for specific codecs (i.e. Vorbis and Theora). An Ogg file may use a codec that is not supported by the browser, so if you don't specify the codec, the browser can only guess that it might be able to play it.
  • "" (the empty string) - the media type is certainly not playable

So, instead of testing for "probably", you could test for a non-empty string (i.e., test for either "probably" or "maybe"), like so:

var audio = new Audio();
if(audio.canPlayType("audio/mpeg") != "") {
    playSound("myMedia.mp3");
} else if(audio.canPlayType("audio/ogg") != "") {  // test for *any* Ogg codecs
    playSound("myMedia.ogg");
}
// do check for other types...

Basically, the tradeoff with Ogg testing is this:

  • Testing specific codecs - new codecs may arise in the future, and your code won't test for them if you hard-code in tests for only Vorbis
  • Accepting "maybe" for general Ogg support - again, new codecs may come into use, and the browser may not support the specific codec used in the .ogg media file you choose to serve to the user

Either way, you're safe until new Ogg codecs come into use, which I don't think will happen in the forseeable future.

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Thanks for your answer. I just need to find a file that works in Opera . I've tried mp3, ogg and wav but nothing works. Do you know how I can convert to webm? I've tried a few free programmes but they all seem to only work for video or just don't do webm. –  Matt Herbstritt Oct 31 '12 at 18:28
1  
According to this article, Opera only supports Ogg Vorbis and WAV. You're probably testing for Ogg support in an incomplete way. "Ogg" is a "container format" that holds encoded media information; "Ogg Vorbis" is a codec type. That's a pretty major tripping point that I failed to specify -- I'll edit my answer to include Ogg-specific info. –  apsillers Nov 5 '12 at 15:49

Use webm for Chrome, Firefox and Opera + wav for Firefox, IE, Safari and Opera.

HTML:

<audio id="audio"></audio>

JS:

var src = "myvideoname";
var is_chrome = navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase().indexOf('chrome') > -1;

if (is_chrome) {
   $("#audio").attr('src', 'audio/' + src + '.webm')
}
else {
   $("#audio").attr('src', 'audio/' + src + '.wav')
}

To explain:
Javascript find out users browser and if it is Chrome it serves webm and if it is not than it use wav

Note: Using this code you need only both webm and wav audio with same name in audio folder.

Note 2: Code needs jQuery.

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Well, see here: jQuery Buzz extension. Never used it, but heard it should work fine. It's able to check if your browser supports some format, really neat feature.

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