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Question: Where does productArray come from in these:

for ( Product product : productArray )

&

Arrays.sort( productArray, new ProductComparator() );

Question: What am I doing wrong? How do I make this sort?

Related Post from Yesterday


                                 EDIT

:::EDIT::: Ok I took your advice here about

Product productArray[] = new Product[ARRAY_LENGTH]

Now it is broke here

/tmp/jc_22339/InventoryPart2.java:99: cannot find symbol
symbol  : variable productArray
location: class InventoryPart2
    for ( Product product : productArray ) {
                            ^
/tmp/jc_22339/InventoryPart2.java:101: cannot find symbol
symbol  : variable productArray
location: class InventoryPart2
        inventoryValue += productArray.calcInventoryValue();
                          ^

And if I do it like

for ( Product product : productArray[] ) {

I get

/tmp/jc_23524/InventoryPart2.java:69: '.class' expected
    for ( Product product : productArray[] ) {
                                           ^

So I am back stuck.


Begin program

:::Updated Code:::

    /**
 This program stores a collection of a product and its variables in a java array
 It will sort and display the information with a total
 */

// Import statements go here
import java.util.Scanner;// Import and use scanner
import java.util.Arrays;


public class InventoryPart2 {

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */

    public static void main(String[] args) {// begin main

        // Define your array of product objects and index here
        final int ARRAY_LENGTH = 5;// declare constant 
        final int version = 2;// declare int version number   

        // Create instance of Scanner class
        Scanner input = new Scanner( System.in );// new Scanner for CL input
        // Set counter to loop x times to populate your array of product objects
        int counter = 0;

        // Initialize your product array with the number of objects to populate it with
        Product productArray[] = new Product[ARRAY_LENGTH];// create array Product of class Product 

        // Welcome message
        System.out.printf( "\n%s%d\n" , 
        "Welcome to the Productentory Program v.", version );

        // Construct default values for Product
        productArray[0] = new Product("EThe Invisible Man", 0, 8.50);
        productArray[1] = new Product("DThe Matrix", 1, 17.99);
        productArray[2] = new Product("CSe7en", 7, 12.99);
        productArray[3] = new Product("BOceans Eleven", 11, 9.99);
        productArray[4] = new Product("AHitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy", 42, 18.69);

        /*// Loop as many times as your counter variable
        {

            // Instantiate a product object

            // Prompt for product name and call the set method on your product object

            // Prompt for item number and call the set method on your product object

            // Prompt for units in stock and call the set method on your product object

            // Prompt for unit price and call the set method on your product object

            // store product object in array element

            //Destroy product object reference
            product = null;

            // Flush the buffer
            input.nextLine();

        }*/

        // Sort product array by product name using Comparator implementation class
        sortProductArray();

        // Print sorted array
        for ( Product product : productArray[] ) {
        if ( counter == 0 )
            System.out.printf( "\n%s\n", "Sorted Inventory of DVD movies");
        System.out.printf( "\n\n%s%d\n%s%s\n%s%d\n%s%,.2f\n%s%,.2f\n",
        "Item Number:      ",counter,
        "DVD Title:        ",productArray[counter].getProductTitle(),
        "Copies in stock:  ",productArray[counter].getUnitsInStock(),
        "Price each disk:  $",productArray[counter].getUnitPrice(),
        "Value of disks:  $",productArray[counter].calcInventoryValue());//End print
        counter++;  
        if ( counter == productArray.length)// on last counter of loop print total
            System.out.printf( "\n%s%,.2f\n\n\n",
            "Collection Value: $",calcTotalInventoryValue());
        }

        // Calculate total Inventory value

    }


 // method to calculate the total Inventory value
 private static double calcTotalInventoryValue()
 {

    double inventoryValue = 0;

    // Iterate array of product objects and calculate total value of entire Inventory
    for ( Product product : productArray ) {
        // accumulate inventory value from each product object in array
        inventoryValue += productArray.calcInventoryValue();
    }

     return totalInventoryValue;

 } // end method calcInventoryValue


 // method to sort product array
 private static void sortProductArray()
 {

    Arrays.sort( productArray, new ProductComparator() );



 } // end method calcInventoryValue


}
share|improve this question
    
What is the question again? .... I'm staring at this question for 2 minutes and I don't know what is it all about –  OscarRyz Aug 22 '09 at 0:56
    
Yeah... me too. What are you asking here? –  Ed S. Aug 22 '09 at 0:57
    
Just a wild guess, but are you asking how to loop over the items in the Product array and how to sort them? It seems like some basic code is given and then the blanks need to be filled out. –  Tchami Aug 22 '09 at 0:58
    
Yes I am stumped on how to make the array sort by Product[counter].getProductTitle() I am supposed to use this line Arrays.sort( productArray, new ProductComparator() ); in the sortProductArry method to do it, along with the comparator object. I can even get the compiler to throw errors for comparator yet because I am stuck. So i am sure I'll have more problems –  lazfish Aug 22 '09 at 1:27
    
@lazfish: Could you post the updated code which produced the compilation errors? –  Zach Scrivena Aug 22 '09 at 2:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You either have to have an array of Product as a member of the InventoryPart2 class OR passed into the sortProductArray method. You'll have to change that method to return a reference to the sorted array if you choose the latter.

Your Product array is in the static main method and not part of the object, so you've got a problem. I'd recommend that you do something like this:

public class Inventory
{
    private static final int DEFAULT_INVENTORY_SIZE = 5;
    private Product [] products;
    private int numProducts;

    public Inventory()
    {
       this(DEFAULT_INVENTORY_SIZE);
    }

    public Inventory(int size)
    {
       products = new Product[size];
       numProducts = 0;
    }

    public void addProduct(Product p)
    {
       products[numProducts++] = p;

    }

    public void sort()
    {
        // sort the array here
    }

    public String toString()
    {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(1024);

        // Create a string representation of you inventory here

        return builder.toString();
    } 
}

Object oriented programming is about encapsulation and information hiding. Write the class in such a way that clients don't have to know or care whether you're using an array or something else to hold onto Products. You're abstracting the idea of Inventory here.

UPDATE:

This is your code, only better and running:

import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.Arrays;

public class InventoryPart2
{
   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
      final int ARRAY_LENGTH = 5;
      final int version = 2;

      int counter = 0;

      Product productArray[] = new Product[ARRAY_LENGTH];

      System.out.printf("\n%s%d\n",
      "Welcome to the Productentory Program v.", version);

      productArray[0] = new Product("EThe Invisible Man", 0, 8.50);
      productArray[1] = new Product("DThe Matrix", 1, 17.99);
      productArray[2] = new Product("CSe7en", 7, 12.99);
      productArray[3] = new Product("BOceans Eleven", 11, 9.99);
      productArray[4] = new Product("AHitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy", 42, 18.69);

      productArray = sortProductArray(productArray);

      // Print sorted array
      for (Product product : productArray)
      {
         if (counter == 0)
         {
            System.out.printf("\n%s\n", "Sorted Inventory of DVD movies");
         }
         System.out.printf("\n\n%s%d\n%s%s\n%s%d\n%s%.2f\n%s%.2f\n",
         "Item Number:      ", counter,
         "DVD Title:        ", product.getProductTitle(),
         "Copies in stock:  ", product.getUnitsInStock(),
         "Price each disk:  $", product.getUnitPrice(),
         "Value of disks:  $", product.calcInventoryValue());
         counter++;
      }
      System.out.printf("\n%s%,.2f\n\n\n",
      "Collection Value: $", calcTotalInventoryValue(productArray));
   }

   private static double calcTotalInventoryValue(Product[] productArray)
   {
      double inventoryValue = 0;

      for (Product product : productArray)
      {
         inventoryValue += product.calcInventoryValue();
      }

      return inventoryValue;

   }

   private static Product[] sortProductArray(Product[] productArray)
   {
      Arrays.sort(productArray, new ProductComparator());

      return productArray;
   }
}

I removed those comments you add everywhere. They're just clutter; I'd recommend that you not do that anymore. Better to make your code more readable and self-documenting by using better variable and method names.

This still isn't the way I'd recommend that you write it, but it works. You're more likely to see why this works if I don't alter it too much.

UPDATE 2:

Just in case you're interested, here's how I might write it:

    import java.util.Scanner;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.text.NumberFormat;

public class Inventory
{
   private static final int DEFAULT_LENGTH = 5;
   private static final int VERSION = 2;

   private Product[] products;
   private int numProducts;

   public static void main(String[] args)
   {
      Inventory inventory = new Inventory(5);

      inventory.addProduct(new Product("EThe Invisible Man", 0, 8.50));
      inventory.addProduct(new Product("DThe Matrix", 1, 17.99));
      inventory.addProduct(new Product("CSe7en", 7, 12.99));
      inventory.addProduct(new Product("BOceans Eleven", 11, 9.99));
      inventory.addProduct(new Product("AHitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy", 42, 18.69));

      System.out.println(inventory);
      System.out.println("total value: " + NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance().format(inventory.getTotalValue()));
   }

   public Inventory()
   {
      this(DEFAULT_LENGTH);
   }

   public Inventory(int size)
   {
      products = new Product[size];

      this.numProducts = 0;
   }

   public void addProduct(Product p)
   {
      products[numProducts++] = p;
   }

   public double getTotalValue()
   {
      double inventoryValue = 0.0;

      for (Product product : products)
      {
         inventoryValue += product.calcInventoryValue();
      }

      return inventoryValue;
   }

   public String toString()
   {
      StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(1024);
      String newline = System.getProperty("line.separator");

      if (products.length > 0)
      {
         Arrays.sort(products, new ProductComparator());
         for (Product product : products)
         {
            builder.append(product).append(newline);
         }
      }

      return builder.toString();
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your code made my head hurt. Thank for what is I am sure a wonderful explanation. I think I need to get off the monkey bars and play in the sandbox awhile. –  lazfish Aug 22 '09 at 1:46
    
Thanks again. I will look at it and I will compare to mine. I guess what I am saying is, thanks for your help & I promise to learn. I think that my professor wants us to focus on learning to code before we learn not to code if you know what I mean. But that is just school for you! I like your cleaner code better. –  lazfish Aug 22 '09 at 15:43
1  
@lazfish: duffymo's 1st answer follows reasoning like this: Java is supposed to be pure OOP, so all algorithms should be encapsulated in classes (your original solution is procedural). The problem is to create an inventory. An inventory has a collection of distinct products and a count of distinct products. A product can be added to an inventory. His code follows from that, with the collection being an array of Product and the product count stored in numProducts. Your instructor will probably cover this soon, including the technical meanings of "pure OOP", "procedural", "is a" and "has a". –  outis Aug 22 '09 at 19:21

This

Product Product[] = new Product[ARRAY_LENGTH];

should be this:

Product productArray[] = new Product[ARRAY_LENGTH];

-- Edit

You'll also need to change relevant lines referring to this 'variable'.

If I may suggest, if you're confused by this, you ask your teacher/book to refresh your memory on "variables".

And don't worry if you don't get it: keep asking until you do. You're cut out for it if you're interested enough to learn. So be interested, ask questions, do your own research, and life will be good.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the encouraging-ness. My inner voice called out to me as i read it ( my inner voice is a jerk ) & said ( Sack-Up Dummy!! ) But seriously. You guys help alot –  lazfish Aug 22 '09 at 1:37

I think "productArray" is supposed to refer to the array of products you've created. So on the line:

Product Product[] = new Product[ARRAY_LENGTH];// create array Product of class Product

Change it too:

Product[] productArray = new Product[ARRAY_LENGTH];
share|improve this answer
    
So i am trying this now and I have to change every call to Product[counter].getBlahBlah to say productArray[counter].getBlahBlah Right? –  lazfish Aug 22 '09 at 1:34
    
Yes, that's correct. –  Noon Silk Aug 22 '09 at 4:04

Don't think to yourself that everyone here started out being able to spot syntax errors in a matter of seconds. We weren't born this way, we just know what to look for because we've made the exact same mistake hundreds of times.

So if you're convinced you want to be a programmer even when you're at your wits end because of stuff like this you are cut out for it. Dedication and passion are far more important than natural talent.

Keep your head up. We'll be here the next time you get stuck. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome. Thanks! –  lazfish Aug 22 '09 at 2:03

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