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I have the following code:

def test
  show_msg and return unless nil
  puts "This line can not be executed"
end

def show_msg
 puts "exit here"
end

test

Output:

exit here
This line can not be executed

I expected the only on line:

exit here

Why?

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2  
By the way, your return on the first line of test will not be executed because show_msg returns nil. – oldergod Oct 31 '12 at 1:15

as said in the comments, this doesn't work because puts actually returns nil, so you can either explictly return something from your show_msg function, or either use p for instance

def test
  show_msg and return unless nil
  puts "This line can not be executed"
end

def show_msg
 p "exit here"
end

test
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I'm not sure what you're trying to do with the unless nil; that's a no-op, because nil will never be a true value. (In Ruby, nil is the one value besides false itself that is considered false in a Boolean truth-test context. It's confusing to say that nil "is false", when it is not equal to false, so Rubyists instead say that nil is "falsey").

Anyway, return unless nil is the same as plain return.

Your show_msg method, lacking an explicit return statement, will return the value of the last statement in it. That statement is a puts, which returns nil. So show_msg also returns nil, and since nil is falsey, the and short-circuits before it gets to the return. Therefore, the return is not executed and Ruby continues on to the next line and executes it.

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1  
It's just a syntetic test. In real it is: show_msg and return unless @variable – odiszapc Nov 1 '12 at 1:20

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